Leviathan

whale-trp200Leviathan: A Journal of Melville Studies appears three times a year in March, June, and October. We welcome articles, notes, reviews, and creative writing on the life, works, and influence of novelist and poet Herman Melville (1819-1891). Click here for more information.

The Eaton Portrait

Herman Melville JOEaton 95ppi 250wBy permission of Houghton Library, Harvard University: 61Z-4

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Melville Electronic Library

mel-thumb-crpd-3The Melville Electronic Library is an online resource for Melville texts. Housed on a Hofstra University server, MEL is being developed and maintained by a group of Melville scholars and digital specialists.

Johns Hopkins University Press

jhup-logoTo join the Melvillle Society and subscribe to Leviathan, visit Leviathan's Johns Hopkins University Press journal site by clicking here.

Melville Society Cultural Project

Melville Society and New Bedford Whaling Museum Cultural Project The New Bedford Whaling Museum in collaboration with The Melville Society is the established home of the Melville Society Cultural Project and Melville Society Archive. The Melville Society Archive is housed at the New Bedford Whaling Museum's Research Library, where significant works from this collection are also on display. The Melville Society Cultural Project also sponsors a book donation program and presents exciting annual events including the Moby-Dick Marathon and a Birthday Lecture.

Herman Melville's Arrowhead

BHS FB HM portraitHerman Melville's Arrowhead Facebook Group page of the Berkshire Historical Society. Celebrating historical Berkshire County and Herman Melville's Arrowhead, the farm and home where Melville lived while writing Moby-Dick.


Events and Announcements

Welcome

The Melville Society is dedicated to the study and appreciation of the nineteenth-century American author Herman Melville, writer of Typee, Moby-Dick, and Billy Budd, such short stories as “Bartleby” and “Benito Cereno,” and several volumes of poetry, including Battle-Pieces and the epic Clarel.

We publish the award-winning journal Leviathan and meet twice a year for fellowship and scholarly discourse at the annual conferences of the Modern Language Association and the American Literature Association.  We also sponsor International Conferences and tours every other year.

Membership and Donations

Membership in The Melville Society is open to all. For information about joining The Melville Society click here. If you want to make a special payment or if you are interested in donating to any of the various projects, endowments, and programs sponsored by The Melville Society, click here.

Detailed Container List

BOX 1: Melville (60 Folders)

1: Folder 1

Agee, Mrs. James (Mia Fritsch), correspondence with Jay Leyda 1955: (1 item)

Included is a thank you card referring to Leyda’s note of sympathy regarding James Agee’s death.

23-May-1955

1: Folder 2

Allen, Gay Wilson, correspondence with Jay Leyda 1955: (2 items)

Concerns research regarding Walt Whitman.

undated                     Dec-1955 estimated            (draft from Leyda)

17-Dec-1955

1: Folder 3

Aschaffenburg, Walter, correspondence with Jay Leyda 1954-1955: (3 items)

Walter Aschaffenburg (1927-2005) was a famous composer. Born in Germany, he immigrated to America with his parents at a young age . One of his greatest achievements was his 1964 opera, “Bartleby,” for which Jay Leyda wrote the libretto.

11-Dec-1954

06-Feb-1955             (also an enclosure: plans for Artistic Creation of “Bartleby”)

01-Mar-1955

1: Folder 4

Barbarow, George, correspondence with Jay Leyda 1952-1954: (3 items)

Refers to The Melville Log; some mention of Soviet Film and Emily Dickinson.

08-Oct-1952

21-Jan-1953

05-Sep-1954

1: Folder 5

Batchelder, Charles F., Jr., correspondence with Jay Leyda 1951: (1 item)

Primarily relates to The Melville Log.

09-Jul-1951   (* with notes from Leyda on back)

1: Folder 6

Bennett Book Studios (Whitman Bennett), correspondence with Jay Leyda 1947: (2 items)

Refers to a proposal regarding the publication of selected Melville poems.

undated         Jun-1947 estimated (draft from Leyda)

08-Jun-1947

1: Folder 7

The Berkshire Athenaeum, Pittsfield, MA (Robert Newman), correspondence with Jay Leyda

1954: (3 items): Regards the proposal of “A Bulletin from the Melville Room.”

undated         Sep-1954 estimated (1st draft from Leyda: partial letter from Gordon Williams on back of p.2.;

         note from Leon Howard 22-Dec-1952 on back of p.3)

undated         Sep-1954 estimated (2nd draft from Leyda)

27-Sep-1954

1: Folder 8

Bezanson, Walter, correspondence with The Melville Society 2006: (1 item)

Friend and Melville scholar who studied under Stanley T. Williams at Yale.  Donation of Jay Leyda Papers to Melville Society Archive.

05-Apr-2006

1: Folder 9

Birss, John, correspondence with Jay Leyda 1945: (2 items)

Relates to The Melville Log.

26-Feb-1945

11-Mar-1945

1: Folder 10

Blitzstein, Marc, correspondence with Jay Leyda 1954: (3 items)

Primarily relates to the libretto for “Bartleby.”

25-Oct-1954              (a few notes from Leyda)

20-Nov-1954

11-Dec-1954

1: Folder 11

CBS Radio (George Crothers), correspondence with Jay Leyda 1953: (2 items)

Relates to Leyda’s suggestions regarding CBS Radio’s Invitation to Learning, a series on biographies.

undated                     Jan-1953 estimated (draft by Leyda)

30-Jan-1953             (also contains a draft of a reply from Leyda)

1: Folder 12

Criscitiello, John J., correspondence with Jay Leyda 1955: (2 items)

Regards Horsford’s edition of Melville’s Journal of a Visit to Europe and the Levant.

22-Jan-1955                         (from Leyda)

31-Jan-1955

1: Folder 13

Davis, Merrell Rees, correspondence with Jay Leyda date unknown: (1 item)

Merrell R. Davis(? – 1961)was one of the many prominent Melville scholars of the mid 1900s who studied at Yale University under Stanley T. Williams. Davis is most well known for his Melville's Mardi: A Chartless Voyage (Yale University Press 1952). He was a Professor of American Literature at The University of Washington from 1947 until his death in 1961. Leyda requested inter-library loan of Merrell’s Yale dissertation and received a reply indicating he would have to foster information on how it would be used prior to consent. Leyda’s subsequent, sarcastic rebuttal is only a draft. It is not known if Leyda ever sent the rebuttal to Davis.

undated – most likely prior to the 1951 publication of The Melville Log (draft from Leyda)

1: Folder 14

Fields, Mr. & Mrs. Joseph, correspondence with Jay Leyda 1950-1954: (8 items)

Leyda wrote to the Fields, members of The National Society of Autograph Collectors, searching for the letters of August Van Schaick, manuscripts from Carroll A. Wilson’s collection, any Melville-Hawthorne letters, and manuscripts relating to Emily Dickinson.

undated                     estimated early Sep-1950   (draft from Leyda on brown paper)

12-Sep-1950

undated                     18-Sep-1950                         (draft from Leyda on yellow paper)

20-Sep-1950

undated                     estimated just after 20-Sep (draft from Leyda on small brown paper)

undated                     estimated late Sep 1950

18-Aug-1954                                                             (from Leyda; draft also attached)

undated                     estimated Aug. 1954 reply (on bottom of Leyda’s prior letter)

1: Folder 15

Gilman, William H., correspondence with Jay Leyda 1953-1954: (4 items)

William Gilman was one of the many prominent Melville scholars of the mid 1900s who studied at Yale University under Stanley T. Williams. Gilman’s doctoral dissertation (1947) explored Melville's early life and Redburn, and was later published by the New York University Press (1951) . Gilman was an English Professor at the University of Rochester, probably at the time of this correspondence . He refers to his work on The Letters of Herman Melville (Yale University Press, 1960), co-edited with Merrell Davis, and his involvement with an edition of the Emerson Journals.

06-Feb-1953

23-Feb-1953

25-Nov-1954

27-Dec-1954

1: Folder 16

Harcourt Brace & Co. (Robert Giroux, Gerry Gross), correspondence with Jay Leyda 1950: (5 items)

Correspondence with Giroux primarily relates to the publication of The Melville Log and includes a contract.* Correspondence with Gross refers to an adaptation of Moby-Dick which Leyda “enjoyed very much.” Letters also make mention of the “upcoming John Huston film, Moby-Dick” (1956), an excerpt that Leyda sent from the George Eliot correspondence, and a movie anthology outline.

undated                     estimated Jan-1950 (draft from Leyda, to Giroux)

16-Jan-1950             (from Giroux)

14-Jun-1950 *                       CONTRACT (from Giroux)

undated                     (to Gross, from Leyda)

08-Apr-1955              (from Gross)

1: Folder 17

Hayford, Harrison M. , correspondence with Jay Leyda 1951-1955: (9 items)

Harrison M. Hayford (1916-2001), “Harry,” was one of the several prominent Melville scholars who studied at Yale University under Professor, Stanley T. Williams. He was also a Hawthorne, Emerson, and Poe scholar . He helped found The Melville Society in 1945 and was the General Editor of “The Writings of Herman Melville” published by Northwestern University Press (Evanston, IL) and The Newberry Library (Chicago, IL). Hayford was a Professor of English at Northwestern University. Correspondence is both friendly and professional, covering conversations related to a variety of works. Noted is feedback on The Portable Melville and The Melville Log and references to a visit with Samuel Sukel (of Pittsfield, MA) and his Melville collection. Hayford specifically mentions Sukel’s Melville-Hawthorne letters and Sukel’s theory that “DeWolfe’s book of his seafaring life (1861)” was actually written by Melville. Hayford also specifically notes Sukel’s literary insights into “the Hat” chapter of Moby-Dick and the possibility that a gravestone with a cock on it actually did exist in Pittsfield, MA. and provides anecdotal evidence.

26-Feb-1951

12-Sep-1951

04-Dec-1951

29-Feb-1952*                        (is signed with a typed “hh” and is likely Harrison Hayford)

12-May-1952

07-Apr-1954

22-Jan-1955

04-Feb-1955

08-Sep-1955

1: Folder 18

Heflin, Wilson Lumpkin., correspondence with Jay Leyda 19?-1955: (5 items)

Wilson L. Heflin (1913-1985) was a Stephen Crane and Melville scholar, and an English Professor at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland, at the time of this correspondence. Heflin was also a founding member of The Melville Society. The letters are both friendly and professional in nature. Of interest may be a note referring to a possible literary prototype for Bartleby found in David Daiches’s, Robert Burns. Many letters refer to Leyda’s feedback and input on Heflin’s Herman Melville’s Whaling Years, originally his 1952 Vanderbuilt University dissertation but which he was trying to publish in book form . The dissertation did not make it into book form until after Heflin’s death (edited by Mary K. Bercaw Edwards and Thomas F. Heffernan, 2004).

undated

22-Apr-1954

10-Jun-1954

25-May-1955

07-Jul-1955

1: Folder 19

Howard, Leon, correspondence with Jay Leyda 1951-1952: (2 items)

Leon Howard (1903-1982), Melville scholar and English Professor at The University of California. Letters are mainly personal in nature.

26-Aug-1952

22-Dec-1952             (photocopy; original in Box 1: Folder 7: the Berkshire Athenaeum)

1: Folder 20

James, Cyril Lionel Robert (C.L.R) correspondence with Jay Leyda 1952-1953 estimated: (3 items)

C.L.R. James (1901–1989),a native Trinidadian, was a political philosopher, historian, and essayist. During the time of this correspondence, James was living in the United States after several years abroad in Europe. He was studying American civilization and the interplay between the creative individual and expression and government, a subset of his common theme, often described as the struggle between “socialism and barbarism.” Letters relate to James’s book, Mariners, Renegades and Castaways (1953), a political interpretation of Moby-Dick, and a 1952 CBS radio show “Invitation to Learning” regarding The Holinshed Chronicles , which James was scheduled to discuss with Louis Hacker. See also Box 1: Folder 28, Morewood, Helen.

15-Oct-1952              (Third party: Saul Blackman to Jay Leyda)

undated                     estimated 1953?

undated                     estimated 1953?  (draft from Leyda)

1: Folder 21

Kaplan, Sidney and Cora, correspondence with Jay Leyda 1952-1955: (11 items)

Sidney Kaplan was an English Professor at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and a scholar of Melville, Poe, and Black American history and culture. Letters are both professional and personal in nature . Includes questions from Kaplan regarding his research on Melville’s Benito Cereno and feedback related to Leyda’s work on Emily Dickinson.

15-Apr-1952

02-May?-1954

01-Nov-1954

03-Feb-1955

07-Feb-1955

03-Jun-unknown year                    estimated 1955(reference to son, born in 1952, as a toddler)

02-Jan-1956                         (note from Cora, daughter)

01-Feb-1956

08-Sep-1955

29-Nov-1955

19-Dec-1955

1: Folder 22

Kazin, Alfred, correspondence with Jay Leyda 1952: (6 items)

Alfred Kazin (1915-1998) was a famous autobiographer and well known for three volumes of memoirs, A Walk in the City. Leyda lived in Kazin’s Brooklyn apartment while Kazin was away in Europe at the time of this correspondence . Letters are both friendly and professional.

12-Mar-1952

05-Apr-1952

03-May-1952

18-Jun-unknown year                    estimated 1952

30-Jun-1952

22-Jul-1952

1: Folder 23

Kirschner, Leon, correspondence with Jay Leyda, dates unknown: (3 items)

Leon Kirschner (1919–2009) was an American composer, pianist, conductor, and Harvard lecturer. Letters refer to Leyda’s proposal for the opera, “Bartleby.”

16-Oct-unknown year                     estimated 1953 or 1954

Undated                                 (draft from Leyda)

Undated                                 (draft from Leyda)

1: Folder 24

Kirstein, Lincoln Edward, correspondence with Jay Leyda 1951: (3 items)

Lincoln Edward Kirstein (1907-1996) was a Harvard graduate and founder of the literary magazine, Hound and Horn in 1927 . More notably, he was a co-founder of The Museum of Modern Art (1929) and The New York City Ballet (1948). Interested in almost all aspects of American art, literature, and culture, Kirstein authored over 500 works during his lifetime.

Correspondence alludes to Kirstein’s research on “Mr. Rimmer,” who may have been the inspiration for the character, Professor Bhaer in Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women. Letters are both friendly and professional in nature.

02-Mar-unknown year        estimated 1951 (Catcher in The Rye was first published)

02-Jul-1951  

undated                                 estimated after July 2, 1951

1: Folder 25

Lankes, J.J., correspondence with Jay Leyda 1954: (2 items)

Refers to Leyda’s search for information about Melville’s shipmate written about in Typee. Leyda refers to this shipmate as “ R.T. Greene? Or another?” Lankes’s reply cannot confirm the name of the shipmate, only that he was “a man who lived in Western N.Y. not far from his home,” and that the letter revealing such information “appears to have been destroyed.” Lankes provides an address for his brother who could possibly remember the man’s name.

undated                                 estimated 1954 (draft from Leyda)

20-Sep-1954                         (addressed to a third party)

1: Folder 26

Lawrence, Dan H., correspondence with Jay Leyda 1951: (2 items)

Dan Lawrence was a Professor of English at New York University at the time of this correspondence . Lawrence writes Leyda thanking him for information concerning the end papers of The Melville Log. Also refers to Lawrence’s Department Chair, a Mr. Oscar Cargill, who was probably a member of the “Melville-connected Cargill Clan.”

04-Dec-1951

06-Dec-1951

1: Folder 27

Life Magazine (Robin Hinsdale), correspondence with Jay Leyda 1954: (3 items)

Refers to the origins of the Acushnet watercolors featured in The Melville Log.

21-Jul-1954

undated                                 estimated between July 21-30, 1954 (draft from Leyda)

30-Jul-1954

1: Folder 28

Melville Family Members (Isabel LeRoy Brown, niece of Thomas Melville; Halsey DeWolf, distant relative; and Eleanor Melville Metcalf, granddaughter of Melville), correspondence with Jay Leyda, 1947, 1952: (5 items)

undated                     estimated Aug. 1947 (draft from Leyda to Brown)

31-Aug-1947             (Brown to Miss Leyda)

02-Sep-1947             (DeWolf)

13-Nov-1947             (DeWolf)

27-Mar-1952             (Metcalf)

1: Folder 29

Morewood, Helen, correspondence with Jay Leyda 1951-1952: (3 items)

Helen Morewood’s parents were friends of Allan and Herman Melville . In addition to information about Melville’s family, there is a reference to a lecture by C.L.R. James and his upcoming book.

15-Apr-1951

22-Apr-1951

08-Mar-1952

1: Folder 30

Murray, Henry A., correspondence with Jay Leyda 1947, 1952: (3 items)

Henry A. Murray (1893-1988) was a famous American psychologist who spent much of his life writing about Melville. In these letters, he provides feedback to Leyda on the manuscript for The Melville Log and offers praise.

undated                     estimated 1947

30-Dec-1947

31-Jan-1952

1: Folder 31

New York State Library, correspondence with Jay Leyda 1950-1954: (3 items)

Relates to Leyda’s search for issues of the Albany Microscope and the Evening Journal.

10-May-1950

29-May-1950

06-Aug-1954

1: Folder 32

Pearson, Norman Holmes, correspondence with Jay Leyda 1954-1955: (6 items)

Norman Holmes Pearson was an English Professor at Yale University and a Hawthorne scholar. Correspondence is both personal and professional in nature . Pearson comments about his progress on his work on Hawthorne and a possible reference to James Agee’s funeral. Pearson also makes many offers to employ Leyda and help him with his research.

17-Jul-1954

09-Sep-1954

02-Nov-1954

05-Apr-1955

11-Jul-1955

20-Aug-1955

1: Folder 33

Pierce, Cornelia Marium, correspondence with Jay Leyda 1951: (2 items, 3 correspondences)

Relates to Leyda’s search for more information on the Melville family.

05-Feb-1951

10-Feb-1951             (from Leyda)

13-Feb-1951             (written on Leyda’s letter of Feb. 10th)

1: Folder 34

Providence Public Library (Stuart C. Sherman), correspondence with Jay Leyda 1954: (2 items)

Stuart Sherman was the Associate Librarian of the Providence Public Library at the time of this correspondence. Letters refer to notes Leyda sent Sherman on three whaling logs he discovered in the FDR Library in Hyde Park and a note about Benjamin Rush.

06-Aug-1954

27-Sep-1954

1: Folder 35

Random House, Inc. (Donald Klopfer, Bennet Cerf, & Albert Erskine), correspondence with Jay Leyda 1948-1952: (3 items)

Includes a contract for Leyda’s introduction to The Complete Stories of Herman Melville (Random House, 1949) . Leyda’s letter to Cerf requests removal of his name as the editor of The Selected Writings of Herman Melville (different from The Complete Stories) and explains his stance. Erskine’s letter of Sep. 16th refers to Leyda’s Bronte Project.

09-Feb-1948             * CONTRACT

30-Jun-1951             (from Leyda to Alfred Bennet Cerf)

16-Sep-1952            

1:Folder 36

Reeves, John, correspondence with Jay Leyda 1954: (5 items)

John Reeves was possibly a Professor of American Literature near Saratoga Springs, NY. Letters refer to Yaddo, an artist’s community frequented by Leyda and his literary and artistic circle of friends. Mentions a trip to Gansevoort, NY.Also refers to Leyda’s idea for a Melville-Gansvoort exhibition at Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs . Some brief mention of Leyda’s involvement with Dickinson and Millicent Todd Bingham.

18-Jun-1954

02-Aug-1954

24-Sep-1954

17-Nov-1954

undated                                 estimated Dec-1954

1: Folder 37

Reynal & Hitchcock (Frank Taylor, Albert Erskine, Eugene Reynal, Chester Kerr) correspondence with Jay Leyda 1946-1948: (21 items)

Correspondence primarily discusses proposals, specimens, arrangements, and timelines for the publication of The Melville Log. In 1948, Curtice Hitchcock died and Eugene Reynal sold the publishing company to Harcourt, Brace and Company, Inc . The Melville Log was published by Harcout, Brace & Company, Inc. in 1951. For clarification, names of correspondents from Reynal & Hitchcock are provided. Included is a newspaper clipping attached to one of the letters.

15-Nov-1945             (from Leyda to Mr. Pistole, stapled to Jan. 8th letter from Frank Taylor)

08-Jan-1946             (from Taylor)

14-Jan-1946             (from Leyda to Taylor)

02-May-1946             (from Erskine)

07-May-1946             (from Leyda to Erskine)

21-Jun-1946             (from Erskine)

26-Jun-1946                         (from Leyda to Erskine)

18-Jul-1946               *Mentions Contract attached but is not enclosed here (from Erskine)

12-Sep-1946             (from Reynal: general letter “To Whom it May Concern” for

Leyda’s use while conducting research)

12-Sep-1946             (Office memo from Rita, a secretary, to Erskine)

12-Sep-1946             (from Reynal to Miss Belle Green, Morgan Library)

17-Sep-1946             (from Belle Green, Morgan Library, to Reynal)

20-Jan-1947             (from Kerr to Yale University Library)

12-May-1947             (from Kerr)

03-Jun-1947             * Newspaper Clipping (from Leyda to Kerr)

04-Jun-1947             (from Kerr)

17-Jun-1947             (from Kerr)

23-Jun-1947             (from Kerr)

27-Jun-1947             (from Kerr to Edward Weeks, The Atlantic Monthly)

05-Jan-1948             (from Thomas Wilson, Harvard University Press, to Reynal)

11-Jun-1948             (from Leyda to Reynal)

1: Folder 38

Roper, Laura Wood, correspondence with Jay Leyda,1952-1953: (2 items)

Laura Wood Roper (1911-2003) was a freelance writer and editor and author of several biographies. She alludes to her work on Frederick Law Olmsted, famed landscape architect and designer of New York’s Central Park. Roper eventually wrote FLO: A Biography of Frederick Law Olmsted (John Hopkins University Press, 1973). Letters also mention the “Curtis-Dix correspondence at Harvard,” which Leyda offered to “go through” for Roper, and Melville’s “Putnam period” probably in reference to Melville’s relationship with George Palmer Putnam and Putnam’s Monthly in which many of his short stories were serialized.  See also Box 4: Folder 5: Hooker, Helene for a brief mention of the Ropers.

14-Jul-1952

01-May-1953

1: Folder 39

Rolfe, Edwin and Mary, correspondence with Jay Leyda 1951-1952: (4 letters, 5 items)

Born Solomon Fishman to Russian Jewish Immigrants, Edwin Rolfe (1909 – 1954) was a poet, journalist, and veteran of the Spanish Civil War . Rolfe was an intermittent member of The Communist party, and was blacklisted in 1947 by The House UnAmerican Activities Committee (HUAC). He spent the latter part of his years writing fervently against McCarthyism . He is most well known for his book of poems, First Love (1951). His wife was Mary Wolfe Rolfe. Letters are personal and professional in nature. Many refer to Rolfe’s First Love and other publications. There is also mention of “the Chaplin poem,” about which Leyda must have written to the Rolfes, asking if a friend could use it. There is a reference to The Portable Melville and a question as to whether Melville had ever read Diderot or Bougainville.

12-Jun-1951

12-Nov-1951             (envelope only)

07-Feb-no year         estimated 1952 or after       (from Mary)

27-Feb-1952            

17-Jul-1952

1: Folder 40

Rupert Hart-Davis Limited (David Garnett), correspondence with Jay Leyda 1947: (3 items)

Refers to a search for a “Mrs. [Una] Stephen Borrow.” Offers to publish any of Leyda’s book(s) on Melville, and discusses “Mocha-Dick” and its author, Jeremiah N. Reynolds. Includes brief mentions of The Musorgsky Reader and its English counterpart, Mussorgsky – A Self-Portrait in Documents, and To the Actor, a translation of Michael Chekhov’s acting manual.

23-Apr-1947

30-Jun-1947             (from Leyda)

17-Jul-1947

3: Folder 41

Savannah Public Library (Elizabeth Hodge), correspondence with Jay Leyda 1950-1951: (2 items)

Letters refer to Leyda’s search for information on Rachel Turner and Charles Pond.  Elizabeth Hodge, the Reference Librarian at that time, shares information she discovered about a Mrs. Williamina Barrington Turner.

07-Jul-1950

21-Feb-1951

1: Folder 42

Sealts, Merton M., Jr, correspondence with Jay Leyda 1951-1952: (5 items)

Merton M. Sealts, Jr. (1915 - 2000) was one of the many prominent Melville scholars of the mid 1900s who studied at Yale University under Stanley T. Williams . Also a Ralph Waldo Emerson scholar, Sealts was an Associate Professor at Lawrence College in Appleton, Wisconsin, at the time of this correspondence.Letters refer to Sealts’s work on Melville's Reading: A Check-List of Books Owned and Borrowed (University of Wisconsin Press, 1966) and include very specific questions to Leyda about Melville . Includes much discussion about Melville and references to The Melville Log.

27-Mar-1951

15-Apr-1951

06-Aug-1952

18-Aug-1952

23-Nov-1952

1: Folder 43

Small, Miriam R., correspondence with Jay Leyda 1954: (2 items)

Refers to Small’s inquiry regarding Oliver Wendell Holmes.

30-Aug-1954

03-Sep-1954

1: Folder 44

Smith, Henry Nash, and William M. Gibson, correspondence with Jay Leyda 1954: (2 items)

Henry Nash Smith (1906 – 1986) was a Mark Twain scholar and Professor of English at The University of California at the time of this correspondence. Smith and William Gibson of New York University were collaborating on an edition of the correspondence between Mark Twain and William Dean Howells. Letters refer to their work on this project.

12-Jul-1954               (from Smith)

20-Jul-1954               (from Gibson)

1: Folder 45

Society of the Colonial Wars (Larry P. Lauren), correspondence with Jay Leyda, dates unknown: (3 items)

Responses to questions Leyda had on the original colonies and refers to a manuscript.

undated

23-Jul

09-Aug

1: Folder 46

Stauffacher, Jack Werner (The Greenwood Press), correspondence with Jay Leyda 1951: (3 items).

Jack Werner Stauffacher was the proprietor and printer of The Greenwood Press at the time of this correspondence . Letters relate to proposals for collaboration on new works.

undated                     estimated Jan or Feb 1951 (draft from Leyda)

19-Feb-1951

22-May-1951

1: Folder 47

Stavig, Richard, correspondence with Jay Leyda 1953: (4 items)

Richard Stavig was a Ph.D. student at Princeton completing a dissertation on Billy Budd at the time of this correspondence. Stavig inquires about references made to Billy Budd and the Somers case in The Portable Melville. Stavig also shares his find of Melville’s copy of Thompson’s A Voice from the Nile in The Princeton Library.

15-Jan-1953

undated                     estimated Jan-1953 (draft from Leyda; 2 pages - also on bottom is a

partial draft to an unidentified “Mr. P”)

11-Feb-1953

22-Mar-1953

1: Folder 48

Sukel, Samuel, correspondence with Jay Leyda 1954: (3 items)

Samuel Sukel, from Pittsfield, MA, refers to “The James DeWolf papers at the Baker Library” “as a total loss” to a “Melville digger.” Also references Leyda’s correspondence with Newman from The Berkshire Athenaeum about a proposed Melville room and a possible donation of Henry A. Murray’s Melville collection to said room. Also noted is Sukel’s feedback on A Reminiscence of Berkshire as a possible Melville manuscript and a suggestion to review an anonymous manuscript in the New York Public Library that he believes could have been written by Melville. Also comments on Melville works written by Vincent and Thompson. Incidentally, 44 engravings that belonged to the Melville family and formerly owned by Sukel were donated to the Melville Society Archive by William Reese.

21-Aug-1954

12-May-1954

04-Aug-1954

1: Folder 49

Williams, Gordon R., correspondence with Jay Leyda 1955: (2 items)

Gordon Williams was a co-chairman of the 13th Western Books Exhibition 1953 of the Rounce & Coffin Club of the UCLA Library at the time of this correspondence and possibly an employee of Brentano’s (the bookstore) of California . Also refers to Leyda’s niece, Megan . Williams was possibly Leyda’s brother-in-law? Letters refer to Leyda’s work with Bertensson on Rachmaninoff and the opera “Bartleby”, as well as brief references to Emily Dickinson and Sergei Eisenstein. Includes a philosophical discussion of the “function” of an artist, in response to a comment made by Leyda on the nature of his work on the opera “Bartleby”.

29-Jan-1955

partial, undated                    (missing postcard)

1: Folder 50

Viking Press, The, correspondence with Jay Leyda 1950-1952: (2 items)

Contains the agreements and payments for the publication of The Portable Melville (1952).

02-May-1950             * CONTRACT

25-Jan-1952

1: Folder 51

Vincent, Howard Paton, correspondence with Jay Leyda 1953: (1 item)

Howard P. Vincent (1904 – 1985) was an English Professor at The Illinois Institute of Technology at the time of this correspondence. He was a Herman Melville and Honore Daumier (1808-1879) scholar, known for his edition of Moby-Dick, Or The Whale, co edited with Luther Mansfield (Hendricks House, 1952). He also produced Daumier and his World (Northwestern University Press, 1968), the first biography of the French artist, Daumier, written in the English language. Letter refers to possible collaboration between Leyda and Mentor Williams and Vincent’s own research on Daumier . Also mentions sitting in on a seminar with Harrison Hayford and a discussion about Pierre.

23-Jan-1953

1: Folder 52

Williams, Mentor L., correspondence with Jay Leyda 1951: (1 item)

Mentor L. Williams was primarily a scholar of Henry Rowe Schoolcraft (1793–1864), an American geologist and ethnologist who studied early Native American culture. Williams was a Professor at Illinois Institute of Technology at the time of this correspondence. Mentions Dr. Addison Gulick’s papers pertaining to Melville and his own work on the “Melville–missionary problem.”

10-Jul-1951

1: Folder 53

Wilson, Carroll Atwood, correspondence with Jay Leyda 1947: (1 item)

Carroll A. Wilson was a collector of nineteenth-century English and American Literature. He was a member of the Williams College, MA, class of 1907. Correspondence relates to arrangements to meet with Leyda. Wilson writes “I will bring my Melville catalogue home from the office.”

24-Mar-1947

Chronological Correspondence

1: Folder 54

Incoming, undated, correspondence with Jay Leyda: (10 items)

Senders: unknown,“F,” “EE,” J.N. Moody, Jake, John M. Connole (New York Times Book Review), “D,” Stuart Seidel Jr., [Lawina?] P. [Taurer?],  [Rolf?]

1: Folder 55

Incoming 1946-1947, correspondence with Jay Leyda: (3 items)

Senders: Mrs. Ernst Heyl, Gladys Burch, Margot Johnson (A. and S. Lyons, Inc.).

1: Folder 56

Incoming 1948-1949, correspondence with Jay Leyda: (2 items)

Senders: Mrs. Charles Ives, Lester G. Wells (Seymour Library, Auburn, NY).

1: Folder 57

Incoming 1950-1951, correspondence with Jay Leyda: (7 items)

Senders: Abraham Bornstein (Boston Book and Art Shop, Inc.), E. Byrne Hackett, Ruth L. Connell, unknown, Sarah R. Bartlett (Concord Free Library) draft from Leyda to Mr. Pratt on back, F.B. Adams, Jr. (The New Colophon), Mrs. Carol Van Buren Wight.

1: Folder 58

Incoming 1953, correspondence with Jay Leyda: (2 items)

Senders: Irene M. Poirier (Lenox Library Association), Edith B. Jackson.

1: Folder 59

Incoming 1954-1955, correspondence with Jay Leyda: (8 items)

Senders: A.B.C. Whipple (LIFE Magazine), John [D] (Wittenberg College), Alexander Klein,Ruth Davenport, Roger W. Barrett, unknown, * Mrs. Ethel Walsh (The Town Hall Club, Inc.), Leo Marx.

* On back of the letter from Walsh, dated 09-Dec-1954, Leyda copied down portions of two different reviews of the 1954 opera Bartleby, by William Flanagan, as appeared in the New York Times and the New York Herald Tribune, both published in the May 11, 1954, editions.

1: Folder 60

Outgoing, undated, drafts by Jay Leyda: (7 items, 9 letters)

undated                     (to “Miss Bailey,” possibly Margaret Bailey)

undated                     (to “Mr. Butterfield,” possibly Lyman Butterfield – see Box 3: Folder 16) undated                      (to “Mr. Pratt”)

undated                     (to “Mr. Roseberry”)

undated                     (to “Dr. Stroven,” likely Carl Stroven, Univ. of Hawaii at Manoa Library) undated                 (to “Mr. T”)

undated photocopy (to “Prof. Tinker,” possibly Chauncey Brewster Tinker ; “Willard,” likely Willard L. Thorp; and “Mr. Williams,” possibly Stanley T. Williams).

See also:

Box 2: Folder 4: Citizen’s Film Ltd, brief mention of Melville.

Box 3: Folder 12: Library of Congress, brief mention of Melville.

Box 3: Folder 28: Williams, Stanley T., brief mention of Melville

Box 3: Folder 22: Ward, Theodora Van Wagenen., brief mentions of Melville in selected letters: 17-Jul-195; 26-Aug-1954

Box 4: Folder 5: Hooker, Helene,brief mention of Melville.

Box 4: Folder 8: Smith, Robert J., on back of letters are original pieces of outgoing drafts from Leyda to Professor Tinker, Professor Willard L. Thorp (1899-1992), and possibly Professor Stanley T. Williams.

 

Detailed Container List

BOX 2: Film & Russian Studies Correspondence (19 Folders)

(General Film Industry, Russian & Soviet Film History, Eisenstein, Musorgsky, Rachmaninoff, and others)

2: Folder 1

The American Scholar (Hiram Haydn), correspondence with Jay Leyda 1946: (1 item)

Hiram Haydn was editor of The American Scholar from 1944-1973 and asks Leyda to submit his translation of an article by Eisenstein in this letter.

25-Nov-1946

2: Folder 2

Bertensson, Sergei Lvovich, correspondence with Jay Leyda 1954-1955: (3 items)

Sergei Bertensson (1885-1962), native of Russia, was a Chekov and Rachmaninoff historian. A graduate of The Imperial University in St. Petersburg, he served as the General Manager of the Moscow Art Theater where he met and subsequently befriended Rachmoninoff. Bertensson played an integral role in the troupe’s first appearance in the United States in 1923, featuring the young emergent Russian Composer, and facilitated his eventual move to the United States in the 1940s.  Bertensson translated Russian texts for potential American films, and served as a dialogue coach for several actors on selected films. He met Jay Leyda during the filming of Mission to Moscow (Warner Brothers, 1943) for which Leyda was the technical advisor.. Co-authored The Musorgsky Reader and eventually, the authoritative biography of Rachmaninoff, Sergei Rachmaninoff: a Lifetime in Music (Indiana University Press, 1956) to which his letters refer.

21-Jul-1954

12-Nov-1954             (telegram, possibly from Bertensson)

04-Nov-1955

2: Folder 3

British Film Academy (Roger Manville), correspondence with Jay Leyda 1949-1950: (5 items)

Relates to Leyda’s History of the Russian Cinema.

25-Apr-1949

undated                     estimated 23-Jun-1949       (draft from Leyda)

01-Jul-1949

undated                     estimated 22-Oct-1950        (draft from Leyda)

10-Nov-1950


2: Folder 4

Citizens Film Ltd (Herbert Marshall), & Preslit Literary Agency (Helen Black),  correspondence with Jay Leyda 1947: (3 items)

Relates to the Charlie Chaplin book and Griffiths articles, the publication of Leyda’s “Melville book”, History of Russian Cinema, Film principles, and Chaplin.

06-Feb-1947             (from Marshall)

21-Oct-1947              (from Black)

04-Nov-1947             (from Marshall)

2: Folder 5

Elton, Arthur, correspondence with Jay Leyda undated: (2 items – only portions)

Arthur Elton ((1906-1973), was a prestigious British documentary film director and producer.

2: Folder 6

George Allen & Unwin Ltd. (Ronald Eames),  correspondence with Jay Leyda 1949: (3 items)

Relates to Leyda’s History of the Russian Cinema.

undated                     estimated 23-Jun-1949       (draft from Leyda)

29-Jun-1949

23-Aug-1949

2: Folder 7

Harcourt, Brace and Company (Robert Giroux), correspondence with Jay Leyda 1945: (1 item). Refers to Musorgsky and Eisenstein, and a suggestion for Leyda to write a book about the history of Soviet film.

25-Oct-1945

2: Folder 8

Ivens, Joris, and Marion Michelle, correspondence with Jay Leyda and Si-Lan Chen 1946: (5 items)

Joris Ivens (1898-1989) was a Dutch documentary filmmaker. Marion Michelle (1913-2007) was a photographer and camera woman, and was the principle cinematographer for Ivens’ film, Indonesia Calling

undated                     (from Ivens and Michelle)

13-May                       estimated 1946 (from Ivens and Michelle)

20-May-1946             (from Ivens)

24-Oct-1946              (from Ivens)

24-Oct                                    estimated 1946 (from Michelle)


2: Folder 9

Koch, Howard and Anne, correspondence with Jay Leyda 1951 – unknown : (8 items)

Howard Koch (1901-1995) was a renowned Hollywood American screenwriter. His wife, also a writer, was Anne Green. Originally a playwright, Howard began scripting radio series in the late 1930s for John Houseman and Orson Welles. Asked by Welles to update H.G. Wells’ novel, War of the Worlds, in the form of news bulletins and personal narratives, Koch produced Invasion from Mars, upon which the famous radio broadcasts of War of the Worlds were based. Eventually making the transition to film, he is most famous for his work on Casablanca (1943) for which he won an Academy Award with his collaborators in 1944.  After being blacklisted, Howard and Anne moved to Europe with their children.  When Howard died in 1995 at the age of 93, his children, Karyl Trainor and Peter Koch, were still living.  They may have had a third child who died. Correspondence from both Howard and Anne is largely personal, with particular reference to the illness of their daughter, but includes many references and discussions about Koch’s work.  Some brief references to Leyda’s work on Emily Dickinson and Herman Melville are also mentioned. Includes some references to Koch being blacklisted in the 1950s by the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC). Finally, correspondence includes holiday cards and drawings made by their son, Peter.

08-Feb-unkown year

20-Apr-1951

18-Jun-unknown year

28-Oct-unknown year

undated                                 (in pencil from Anne)

undated                                 Christmas card

undated                                 Christmas card

undated                                 (drawings from Pete with Merry Christmas note)

2: Folder 10

Lerner, Irving, correspondence with Jay Leyda undated: (1 item)

Irving Lerner (1909-1976) was a cinematographer, documentary film director and producer. In this letter, he refers to a “new project” which was later to become The Savage Eye (1959) produced by some of his contemporaries and partners, Joseph Strict, Ben Maddow, & Sidney Meyers. Letter is estimated to coincide chronologically with Leyda’s work on Dickinson.

undated                     estimated mid 1950s

2: Folder 11

Mahaska County Community Theatre, William Penn College (Tom Toman), correspondence with Jay Leyda 1946: (1 item)

Relates to Toman’s interest in Leyda’s experience working with Sergei Eisenstein.

01-Feb-1946

2: Folder 12

Powers, R.M., correspondence with Jay Leyda 1955: (1 item)

Relates to Powers’ illustration of Rachnanioff for High Fidelity Magazine.

01-Mar-1955

2: Folder 13

Rotha, Paul correspondence with Jay Leyda 1949: (3 items)

Born Paul Thompson, Rotha (1907-1984) was a British documentary film-maker, historian and critic. Correspondence relates to Soviet Film History.

22-Feb-1949

undated         estimated Mar 0r Apr-1949 (draft from Leyda)

02-Apr-1949

2: Folder 14

Roucek, Joseph, correspondence with Jay Leyda undated: (1 item)

Joseph Roucek, Editor in Chief of The Encyclopedia Slavonica, asks Leyda to write an article on Russian  / Slavonic Motion Pictures.

2: Folder 15

Russian Research Center (Project on the Soviet Social System), correspondence with Jay Leyda 1953: (1 item with enclosure)

Relates to a showing of Miners of the Don, a Russian film, at Harvard University. Enclosure is the cast of characters and general information about the film.

21-May-1953                         (notes from Leyda on back)

2: Folder 16

Seton, Marie, correspondence with Jay Leyda and Si-Lan Chen 1951-1952: (10 items)

Marie Seton (b. ? – 1985) was a biographer, and wrote the first biography of Sergei Eistenstein, titled Sergei M. Eisenstein (Brodley Head, London, 1952) to which she refers in this correspondence.

undated

24-Feb-1952

05-Mar                                    estimated 1951

21-May-1951

26-Jun-1951

01-Jul-1951

16-Mar                                    estimated 1952

21-Mar                                    estimated 1952

05-Apr-1952

15-Dec-1952

2: Folder 17

Souvaine Selective Pictures, inc. (Herman Weinberg), correspondence with Jay Leyda 1952-1953: (2 items)

Relates to a request for contributions from Leyda to CINEMA, a film magazine in Milan for which Herman Weinberg (1908- ) was the US Correspondent.

26-Dec-1952

10-Jan-1953

2: Folder 18

Incoming, unknown correspondent, correspondence with Jay Leyda: (1 item)

Sender: “Mack”, Antioch College, Ohio

Relates to Mack’s request for information regarding his talk on “Literature and Movies” for a group of students at Antioch College.

02-Jun-1946

2: Folder 19

Outgoing draft from Leyda undated (1 item)

undated                     (to “Mr. Stepanov”)

 

Credits

whale-shadow-85

We gratefully acknowledge permission to publish the following images

 

Left Sidebar - Top

Herman Melville JOEaton-95ppi-250w
(Click to view a larger image or right-click
to open full-size in a new tab or window.)

This portrait of Herman Melville by Joseph Oriel Eaton, May 1870,
was commissioned and presented to the family by Melville's brother-in-law, John Hoadley
(Hershel Parker, Herman Melville: A Biography, Vol. 2, 703-4).
By permission of the Houghton Library, Harvard University.

Call Number: *61Z-4
Title: Herman Melville [graphic] / JOEaton.
Author: Eaton, Joseph Oriel, 1829-1875, artist.
Owning Repository: Houghton Library - Harvard University - Modern Books and Manuscripts
(>1800) Hollis Number: 008652152

 

Articles

 

Melville and Rome: Call for Papers

 

Piranesi's Arch of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius, from Melville's print collection, by permission of owner.

Mystic Seaport NEH 2010 Summer Institute

The 1841 whaleship Charles W. Morgan berthed at Mystic Seaport Museum."  Photo courtesy of Mystic Seaport Museum.

 

 

 

Detailed Container List

BOX 3: Dickinson (37 Folders)

3: Folder 1

Amherst College (Cole, Charles), correspondence with Jay Leyda 1956: (3 items)

Request to Leyda to catalogue and “put in proper shape” Mrs. Bingham’s materials on Emily Dickinson “for preservation and scholarly use.” Materials were to be donated by Mrs. Bingham.

02-Feb-1956

13-Feb-1956

21-Feb-1956

3: Folder 2

Bingham, Millicent Todd, correspondence with Jay Leyda 1954-1956: (28 items)

Millicent Todd Bingham (1880-1968) was the daughter of Mabel Loomis Todd who dedicated her life to editing the manuscripts and poems of Emily Dickinson.  Upon Mabel Loomis Todd’s death, Millicent took over the tedious task of editing Emily Dickinson’s poems.  She was editing several Dickinson pieces when Jay Leyda began his research, also on Emily Dickinson. These pieces included Emily Dickinson’s Home (Harper & Brothers, 1955) and Emily Dickinson, a Revelation (Harper & Brothers Publishers, 1954). They helped each other recover information about relevant dates, persons, places and relationships, and provided each other with feedback. They also shared an interest in knowing if Rev. Charles Wadsworth (“C.W”), father of famed Dr. William Scott Wadsworth, Philadelphia’s medical examiner and pathologist, was Emily Dickinson’s spiritual advisor.  See also Box 3: Folder 1 Amherst College, regarding Bingham’s collection of Dickinson papers. See also Box 3: Folder 12: Johns Hopkins University; Box 3: Folder 13: Johnson; Box 3: Folder 19: Pohl; Box 3: Folder 23: Todd; Box 3: Folder 27: Wadsworth photographs; and Box 3: Folder 29: Ward for more on Wadsworth.

undated                                 estimated  Sep-1954 

21-Sep-1954

21-Sep-1954

22-Sep-1954                         (*notes from Leyda on back)

01-Oct-1954                          (*notes from Leyda on back)

06-Nov-1954

17-Nov-1954

19-Nov-1954

25-Nov-1954            

29-Nov-1954

27-Dec-1954

12-Jan-1955

10-Feb-1955

12-Feb-1955

04-Mar-1955

29-Mar-unknown year        estimated 1955

01-Apr-1955

09-May-1955

3: Folder 2    (continued from previous page) Bingham, Millicent Todd

23-May-1955

undated                     estimated between Jun 22-29, 1955                    (draft from Leyda)

29-Jun-1955

06-Oct-1955

22-Nov-1955

23-Nov-1955

28-Nov-1955

02-Dec-1955             (from Leyda)

11-Feb-1956

20-Feb-1956

3: Folder 3

Bookstores / Booksellers & Collectors, correspondence with Jay Leyda undated, 1954: (6 items)

All letters are responses to Leyda’s search for materials relating to Emily Dickinson.

undated                     (Hillcrest Book Shop)

31-Aug-1954             (Harry A. Levinson, Rare & Precious Books)

09-Sep-1954             (William P. Wreden, Antiquarian Booksellers Association)

10-Sep-1954             (The Union League Club)

22-Sep-1954             (Mabel Zahn, Charles Sessler, Bookseller and Printseller)

27-Sep-1954             (Donald L. LaChance, Rare, Choice & Current Books)

3: Folder 4

Connecticut Valley Historical Museum (Juliette Tomlinson), correspondence with Jay Leyda 1954-1956: (3 items)

Correspondence is both personal and professional in nature with specific mention of “the Merriam stuff.”

13-Aug-1954

09-Sep-1954

24-Jan-1956

3: Folder 5

DuPont, Marcella, correspondence with Jay Leyda 1955: (2 items)

Refers to a letter that Leyda wrote to Mary Hampson in search of documents relating to Emily Dickinson.

18-May-1955

21-Jun-1955


3: Folder 6

Haight, Gordon Sherman, correspondence with Jay Leyda 1955: (1 item)

Gordon S. Haight (1901-1985) was a biographer of women writers of the nineteenth century and a George Eliot scholar. He was an English Professor at Yale University at the time of this correspondence.  Correspondence refers to help Leyda provided Haight while writing an unidentified book, but with a reference to the “Lamartine portrait.”

03-Sep-1955

3: Folder 7

Hampson, Mrs. Alfred Landis (Mary), correspondence with Jay Leyda 1955: (1 item)

Mary Landis Hampson was of a friend of Emily Dickinson's niece Martha Dickinson Bianchi, and the last resident of The Evergreens, the villa of Emily Dickinson's brother Austin and his wife Susan. She lived next door to the Dickinson Homestead. Letter refers to Dickinson material owned by Harvard.

17-Jun-1955            

3: Folder 8

Harcourt, Brace & Company, Inc. (Jerold Hickey), correspondence with Jay Leyda 1951-1955: (1 item)

Refers to an article in Harper’s Bazaar on “Emily Dickinson’s Lover” (Nov. 1951).

31-Oct-1951              (article enclosed)

3: Folder 9

Harper & Brothers (Elizabeth Laurence), correspondence with Jay Leyda 1954: (1 item

Relates to the possibility of reissuing of the 1931 Emily Dickinson Letters.

14-Oct-1954

3: Folder 10

Harvard University, Library of (William A. Jackson), correspondence with Jay Leyda 1954: (1 item).

Discusses access to Millicent Todd Bingham’s Dickinson material.

13-Aug-1954

3: Folder 11

Haverford College Library (Anna B. Hewitt), correspondence with Jay Leyda 1954: (1 item)

Anna Hewitt was the Assistant Curator of The Quaker Collection at Haverford and responds to Leyda’s inquiry regarding the contents of Charles Roberts Autograph Collection.

02-Sep-1954


3: Folder 12

Johns Hopkins University (M.L.Raney), correspondence with Jay Leyda 1956: (1 item)

Mr. Raney expresses interest in reading what Leyda’s “new disclosures will be” in his new book regarding the relationship between Dickinson and the Reverend Charles Wadsworth. See also Box 3: Folder 2: Bingham; Box 3: Folder 13: Johnson; Box 3: Folder 19: Pohl; Box 3: Folder 23: Todd; Box 3: Folder 27: Wadsworth photographs; and Box 3: Folder 29: Ward for more on Wadsworth.

04-Mar-1956

3: Folder 13

Johnson, Thomas Herbert, correspondence with Jay Leyda 1953-1955: (8 items)

See also Box 3: Folder 10, New England Quarterly.

Thomas H. Johnson ((1902-1985), renowned Dickinson scholar, was a English Professor at The Lawrenceville School in Lawrenceville, N.J. at the time of this correspondence.  In the letters, Johnson consults Leyda on various Dickinson matters as he was writing Emily Dickinson: An Interpretative Biography (Belknap Press, 1955) and editing The Poems of Emily Dickinson (Harvard University Press, 1955). Johnson also mentions the mystery behind “CW” referring to whether or not “CW” was, in fact, the Reverend Charles Wadsworth and the nature of the relationship. See also Box 3: Folder 2: Bingham; Box: 3: Folder 12: Johns Hopkins University; Box 3: Folder 19: Pohl; Box 3: Folder 23: Todd; Box 3: Folder 27: Wadsworth photographs; and Box 3: Folder 29: Ward. Of interest may be an unpublished letter of Emily to a “Mr. Sanborn” that C. Waller Barrett, of the Seven Gables had just purchased. See 3: Folder 27: Ward  for more on Johnson.

10-Mar-1953             (a returned letter from Leyda, to May Geneviene Hardy, with handwritten

note to Johnson; Johnson’s handwritten reply in upper left corner).

18-Aug-1954

undated

11-Mar-1955

23-Mar-1955

undated, unsigned postcard

18-Jul-1955

12-Oct-1955              (transcript of an unpublished letter to “Mr. Sanborn” attached)

3: Folder 14

Library of Congress, correspondence with Jay Leyda 1954-1955: (4 items)

Refers to the review written by Leyda on Bingham’s book, Emily Dickinson’s Home in The United States Quarterly Book Review and includes a copy. Draft of review is also included with a handwritten note to Blickenstein, the editor of the USQBR, Library of Congress.

26-Nov-1954

09-Aug-1955

copy of Review

undated                                 estimated 1955 (Leyda’s draft of review, note to Blickenstein)


3: Folder 15

Milwaukee County Historical Society (Frederick T. Olson), correspondence with Jay Leyda 1954: (3 items)

Letters relate to the Historical Society’s suggestion for Leyda to write a “short piece with a Milwaukee setting” for the Historical Messenger.  Also included are references to “J.L. Dudley”, (Reverend John Langdon Dudley), and a search for letters with Amherst friends, including Dickinson, Middletown parishioners, the Coleman and Fiske families, and Helen Maria Fiske Hunt Jackson (author and Dickinson friend and enthusiast).

29-Jun-1954

undated                                 estimated 19-Aug-1954 (draft from Leyda)

07-Nov-1954

3: Folder 16

New England Quarterly (Katharine Thompson), correspondence with Jay Leyda undated: (1 item)

Thompson is pleased that Leyda has agreed to review Thomas Johnson’s Emily Dickinson, and “is sending it along.”  Note mentions Betty Bezanson.

undated

3: Folder 17

New Republic (Robert Evett), correspondence with Jay Leyda 1954-1955: (4 items)

Letters refer to an article Leyda wrote on Dickinson for the New Republic.

06-Oct-1954

11-Jan-1955

05-Feb-1955

17-Feb-1955

3: Folder 18

Papers of Thomas Jefferson (Julian P. Boyd), correspondence with Jay Leyda 1955: (1 item)

Letter relates to an unidentified proposal Leyda made to Boyd, possibly an offer to conduct research, but on what remains unclear. Boyd also makes references to Lyman Butterfield, possibly the “Mr. Butterfield” from Box 1: Folder 59: Outgoing Drafts.

30-Nov-1955


3: Folder 19

Pohl, Josephine Pollitt, correspondence with Jay Leyda undated, 1955: (3 items)

Correspondence is both friendly and professional. Once a Dickinson scholar and author of a 1930 book on Dickinson, Josephine provides Leyda with feedback and insights on Dickinson.  She praises Leyda for his article in the New Republic, comments on Bingham’s Emily Dickinson’s Home, and refers to the interpretation of the Rev. Charles Wadworth’s relationship to Dickinson. See also Box 3: Folder 2: Bingham; Box: 3: Folder 12: Johns Hopkins University; Box 3: Folder 13: Johnson; Box 3: Folder 23: Todd; Box 3: Folder 27: Wadsworth photographs; and Box 3: Folder 29: Ward.

undated

29-Jun-1955

06-July-1955

3: Folder 20

Providence Public Library (Stuart C. Sherman), correspondence with Jay Leyda 1953-1954: (1 item)

Stuart Sherman was the Assistant Librarian at the time of the correspondence and responds to an inquiry from Leyda about a possible Dickinson collection at the Providence Public Library.

28-Feb-1953

3: Folder 21

Seven Gables Bookshop (C. Waller Barrett, R.T. Roberts), correspondence with Jay Leyda undated, 1954-1955: (3 items)

Leyda writes the owner of Seven Gables Bookshop, C.W. Barrett, Collector of old and rare books in the hopes that a “manuscript scrap” of Dickinson’s may be tracked down in his collection in time for Tomas H. Johnson’s publication of The Poems of Emily Dickinson (Harvard University Press, 1955).  Subsequent correspondence takes place between R.T. Roberts, on behalf on Mr. Barrett, and Leyda regarding two short notes found on Dickinson.  The two short notes are transcribed in the 01-Nov-1954 letter from Roberts.

undated                     estimated 25-Sep-1954       (draft from Leyda to Barrett)

01-Nov-1954             (reply from Roberts)

undated*                    estimated       Nov. 1954      (draft from Leyda, to Roberts)

*written on the back of a telegram from “Sergei,” possibly Sergei Bertensson – see Box 2: Folder 2: Bertensson.            


3: Folder 22

Todd, Minister G. Hall, correspondence with Jay Leyda 1954-1955: (8 items)

G. Hall Todd was the Minster of the Arch Street Presbyterian Church in Philadelphia at the time of this correspondence. He was a friend and probably the Minister of the famous Dr. William Scott Wadsworth, Philadelphia’s medical examiner and pathologist, who was, in turn, the son of the late Reverend Charles Wadsworth. Leyda had an unsigned letter to Emily Dickinson monogrammed “CW”, and believed it to be from the Reverend Charles Wadsworth. Leyda also believed the Reverend to be Emily’s spiritual advisor, contrary to others’ held beliefs that “CW” was possibly Emily’s lover. Leyda writes to Todd in the hopes that he may help resolve this mystery by speaking with Dr. Wadsworth and arranging a meeting between Wadsworth and Leyda.  Dr. Wadsworth becomes ill and passes away before a definite resolution on this matter is possible. See also Box 3: Folder 2: Bingham; Box: 3: Folder 12: Johns Hopkins University; Box 3: Folder 13: Johnson; Box 3: Folder 19: Pohl; Box 3: Folder 23: Todd; Box 3: Folder 27: Wadsworth photographs; and Box 3: Folder 29: Ward for more on Wadsworth.

13-Oct-1954

undated                     estimated late Oct. 1954     (draft from Leyda)

30-Oct-1954

09-Feb-1955

22-Feb-1955

28-Feb-1955

undated                     estimated early Mar. 1955  (draft from Leyda)

20-Mar-1955             (Dr. Wadsworth’s obituary attached)

3: Folder 23

Trustees of Forbes Library (Lawrence E. Wikander), correspondence with Jay Leyda 1956: (1 item)

This letter is a reply to Leyda’s inquiry about information regarding a Sidney E. Bridgeman, his family, and an unidentified book Leyda sought.

12-Jan-1956

3: Folder 24

University of California (Lawrence Clark Powell), correspondence with Jay Leyda 1953: (1 item)

Letter recommends a private collection of Emily Dickinson letters be offered to Harvard, and turns down a third party offer to purchase a Lewis Carroll collection.

12-Jan-1953

3: Folder 25

Van Boven, Alice, correspondence with Jay Leyda 1954: (1 item)

Alice Van Boven writes to Leyda about a collection of Amherst letters in which she determines at least one to be from her grandmother to Miss Vinnie Dickinson (Lavinia).  Van Boven alludes to and affirms Leyda’s suggestion to give the collection, once sorted, to UCLA

22-Nov-1954

3: Folder 26

Wadsworth photographs, correspondence with Jay Leyda 1954: (2 items)

Letters relate to the search for a photograph of the Reverend Charles Wadsworth. Leyda purchased one from The Presbyterian Historical Society.  Subsequently, American Heritage magazine wrote to Leyda asking if he had any photographs of Wadsworth. See also Box 3: Folder 2: Bingham; Box: 3: Folder 12: Johns Hopkins University; Box 3: Folder 13: Johnson; Box 3: Folder 19: Pohl; Box 3: Folder 23: Todd; Box 3: Folder 27: Wadsworth photographs; and Box 3: Folder 29: Ward for more on Wadsworth.

11-Oct-1954              (Guy S.. Kleitt, Dept. of History, Presbyterian Historical Society)

30-Dec-1954             (Stephen Sears, American Heritage)

3: Folder 27

Walter, Dorothy C., correspondence with Jay Leyda 1954: (1 item)

Dorothy Walter shares her insights on Dickinson.

08-Nov-1954


3: Folder 28

Ward, Theodora Van Wagenen, correspondence with Jay Leyda 1954-1956: (17 items)

Theodora Van Wagenen Ward (1890-1974), was the granddaughter of Dr. Josiah Gilbert Holland and Elizabeth (Chapin) Holland, friends and correspondents of Emily Dickinson. Theodora was an artist (wood block carvings) and Dickinson scholar. Author of many Dickinson pieces herself, she was also Thomas H. Johnson’s Editorial Assistant at Belknap Press and Harvard University Press at the time of this correspondence.  Letters relate to the arrangements made between Bingham and Harvard University Press for the release of Bingham’s materials and permission for Johnson to publish his work a year after Bingham’s publication. Ward and Leyda also shared information and advice about Dickinson.Ward was writing her own essay, entitled, “Ourself Behind Ourself – an Interpretation of the Crisis in the Life of Emily Dickinson”, and was seeking its publication. Harvard University Library eventually published this piece in 1956. Of interest may be correspondence regarding “secret” Bingham documents on Emily Dickinson that Leyda was privy to and shared with Ward. Some mention of Wadworth. See also Box 3: Folder 2: Bingham; Box: 3: Folder 12: Johns Hopkins University; Box 3: Folder 13: Johnson; Box 3: Folder 19: Pohl; Box 3: Folder 23: Todd; and Box 3: Folder 27: Wadsworth photographs.

undated

undated

17-Jul-1954

04-Aug-1954

26-Aug-1954

18-Feb-1955

26-Feb-1955

undated         estimated between 26-Feb and 11-Mar-1955 (draft from Leyda on blue paper)

11-Mar-1955

25-Mar-1955

09-May-1955

08-Jun-1955

19-Sep-1955

28-Nov-1955

09-Dec-1955

16-Dec-1955

22-Feb-1956

3: Folder 29

Williams, Stanley T.,correspondence with Jay Leyda 1954: (2 items)

Stanley T. Williams, English Professor at Yale University, refers to Leyda’s Dickinson manuscript. See also Box 3: Folder 30: Yale University Press for an excerpt from Williams on Leyda’s book on Dickinson.

undated                     (possible draft by Leyda)

21-Aug-1954             (postcard)


3: Folder 30

Williams, Mrs. Arthur L (Theresa Wright Williams), correspondence with Jay Leyda 1953: (1 item)

Theresa Wright Williams’s great aunt was Mrs. Sarah Taylor Fowler who was  “written [of] so affectionately” by Emily Dickinson.  Mrs. Williams shares what she knows about her family genealogy concerning the Wrights, Fowlers, and Dickinsons, and some friends and neighbors.

16-Aug-1953

3: Folder 31

Yale University Press (Mr. Davidson and Roberta Yerkes), correspondence with Jay Leyda 1955-1956: (4 items)

Letters relate to the publication of  The Years and Hours of Emily Dickinson (Yale University Press, 1960).

14-Nov-1955

11-Jan-1956

31-Jan-1956

02-Feb-1956

3: Folder 32

Zermer, Louise Gray, correspondence with Jay Leyda 1954: (2 items)

Correspondence relates to Leyda’s search for more information on Edward Dickinson’s friend, Mr. Eastman and his family, of whom Gray refers to in an article she wrote for the Illinois English Bulletin.

undated                     estimated Aug-1954            (draft from Leyda)

26-Aug-1954

Chronological Correspondence

3: Folder 33

Incoming, undated, correspondence with Jay Leyda: (3 items)

undated         (Anna Scannell [uncertain])

undated         (Birtha Van Riper Overbury)

undated         (“bd”)

3: Folder 34

Incoming 1953, correspondence with Jay Leyda: (2 items)

25-Feb-1953(John Moffit, Ramakrishna-Vivekananda Center)

07-Apr-1953  (Kimball C. Elkins, Harvard College Library, Archives)


3: Folder 35

Incoming 1954, correspondence with Jay Leyda: (4 items, 5 letters)

10-Sep-1954             (LOOK, Cowles Magazines Inc.)

12-Oct-1954*             (2 notes from an unknown correspondent, “Jean,” includes third party)

08-Nov-1954             (Winifred Hicks, City of Grand Rapids, Michigan)

07-Dec-1954             (Milton E. Saul, The Caliban Press)

*Typed letter to a third party, “Mildred”, asking her to recall the name of a woman who destroyed some letters written by Emily Dickinson while moving into an “old house in New England.” Jean’s handwritten note to Leyda is on the bottom in pencil.

12-Oct-1954

3: Folder 36

Incoming 1955, correspondence with Jay Leyda: (2 items)

24-Jan-1955             (Sophia Ehrlich)

02-Mar-1955             (Lola Gruenthal)

3: Folder 37

Outgoing, undated, drafts by Jay Leyda: (3 items, 5 letters)

undated                     (to “Harl,” Harl  Cook)

undated                     (to “Mrs. Carson”)

undated photocopy (to “Prof. Tinker,” possibly Chauncey Brewster Tinker;  “Willard,” likely Willard L. Thorp; and “Mr. Williams,” possibly Stanley T. Williams).

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Detailed Container List

BOX 4: Personal Correspondence (15 folders)

(Family, friends, cards, travel documents, service papers)

4: Folder 1

A House to Be Born In, correspondence regarding Leyda’s essay in biography 1955: (2 items)

4: Folder 2

“Carl”, University of Maryland, correspondence with Jay Leyda 1955: (2 items)

4: Folder 3

Curley, Daniel,correspondence with Jay Leyda 1954-1955: (9 items)

4: Folder 4

Hendrickson, James (Jim) and June, correspondence with Jay Leyda 1951, 1955: (3 items)

4: Folder 5

Hooker, Helene, correspondence with Jay Leyda undated, 1951: (2 items)

4: Folder 6

Leyda Family Correspondence,correspondence with Jay Leyda undated, 1952: (5 items)

4: Folder 7

Miscellaneous Friends,correspondence with Jay Leyda undated, 1951-1954: (8 items)

4: Folder 8

Smith, Robert J. (Jack),correspondence with Jay Leyda 1951: (2 items)

* outgoing drafts from Leyda on back (3)

4: Folder 9

Stallman, Robert Wooster (“Papa”) and William (son, Bill) correspondence with Jay Leyda undated: (2 items)

Robert Wooster Stallman (1911-), was a leading Stephen Crane scholar. Friendly letter refers to Alfred Kazin’s opinion of Stephen Crane: An Omnibus, edited by Stallman (Alfred A. Knopf, 1952).

4: Folder 10

Whitmore, Stanford,correspondence with Jay Leyda 1954-1955: (3 items)

4: Folder 11

Writer’s Guild of America ((Jane McGlauflin), correspondence with Jay Leyda 1956: (1 item)


4: Folder 12

Yang, Gladys,correspondence with Jay Leyda undated, 1954-1955: (4 items)

Other

4: Folder 13

Army Correspondence, correspondence with Jay Leyda undated, 1944: (2 items)

4: Folder 14

Holiday Greetings, Cards & Announcements, correspondence with Jay Leyda and Si-Lan Chen 1946-1955: (11 items)

4: Folder 15

Miscellaneous, correspondence with Jay Leyda and Si-Lan Chen 1946-1954: (5 items)

Contains correspondence relating to travel arrangements, license plates, telegrams, and postcards from The Post Office Department.

 

Series II:

Jay Leyda left a box of papers with a friend during his peripatetic life. The contents of this collection comprise a wide assortment of materials and subjects of interest to Jay Leyda. One folder, labeled “Melville Log,” contained material concerning Leyda’s research and planning of that work, but also contained a variety of unrelated material. The rest of the papers range over a variety of subjects and were apparently packed randomly into this box.

In creating this finding aid, I have kept the papers in the “Melville Log” folder separate simply because Leyda labeled them in that manner. Scholars seeking information on Leyda’s research into Melville’s life and work should therefore seek it in both the “Melville Log” folder and the other Melville categories.

Much of the material contained herein is difficult or impossible to date with any certainty. Many of the individual sheets of paper have notes on several very different subjects related only by Leyda’s interest in them. I have categorized each piece according to its predominant subject, but those seeking minutia are encouraged to explore the entire collection carefully.

Detailed Container List

BOX 5: Herman Melville (13 Folders)

           

5: Folder 1

Melville Log Material

Sub-folder 5.1.1 Gilman responses to Leyda queries concerning Melville Log (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.1.2 Ships’ logs, notes (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.1.3 Vessel sailings: Hawaii during Melville’s stay (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.1.4 Newspaper notes (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.1.5 Typee mention in Life Illustrated editorial (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.1.6 New York Historical Society Checklist (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.1.7 Melville family activity (3 items)

Sub-folder 5.1.8 Wise Journal entries     (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.1. 9 UNITED STATES, frigate, copies of journal entries (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.1.10 Corrections of The Melville Log (11 items)

Sub-folder 5.1.11 Questions on The Melville Log (32 items)

5: Folder 2

Possible Melville Sources

Sub-folder 5.2.1 Illustrations, plates, notes (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.2.2 Montgomery, James: Poem, “The Pelican Island,” 1827 (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.2.3 Leviathan reference, 1849 (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.2.4 Encyclopedias, dictionaries, travelogues (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.2.5 Books Melville Read (26 items)

5: Folder 3

Melville’s Lectures

Sub-folder 5.3.1 Tremont Temple lecture 3/5/1857: typed copy of text in Catherine Gansevoort scrapbook (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.3.2 Review of 11/25/1857 lecture in Lawrence Courier, other notes (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.3.3 Leyda reconstruction of Melville’s South Sea Lecture (1 item)

5: Folder 4

Reviews of Melville’s works

Sub-folder 5.4.1 Review copies (4 items)

Sub-folder 5.4.2 Lists of Reviews (7  items)

           

5: Folder 5

Melville Family History and Correspondence

Sub-folder 5.5.1 Miscellaneous notes (7 items)

Sub-folder 5.5.2 Melville Family History (23 items)

Sub-folder 5.5.3 Elizabeth Melville correspondence (2 items)

Sub-folder 5.5.4 Thomas Melville correspondence (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.5.5 Lemuel Shaw correspondence (4 items)

Sub-folder 5.5.6 Excerpts from Melville family letters (1 item)

5: Folder 6

Copies of Melville Texts

Sub-folder 5.6.1 Copies of manuscript versions of Melville poems (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.6.2 Copy of poem “Admiral of the White” given to “Tom” by Melville (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.6.3 Notes on drafts of Melville poems (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.6.4 Copy of poem “Restless, restless”; notes on Mardi draft (1 item)

5: Folder 7

Melville Family: General

Sub-folder 5.7.1 Various notes, Thomas Melville article quotation, printed sources for Melville (6 items clipped together by Leyda)

Sub-folder 5.7.2 Melville Family tree; review of Pierre (2 items)

Sub-folder 5.7.3 Copy of Kate Metcalf list of Melville family dates, letter from New York Historical Society on Melville’s books, including Obed Macy (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.7.4 Notes on letters from Lizzie, Herman Melville (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.7.5 Notes on Arthur Stedman (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.7.6 Transcript of wills in Suffolk County Probate Records (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.7.7 Data from Heflin’s Button article (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.7.8 Thomas Melville note, other notes (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.7.9 Mrs. Metcalf’s note on diary (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.7.10 Excerpt from January 1847 article in Scientific American on the Somers (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.7.11 Peter Gansevoort descendants (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.7.12 Draft of letter re: Peebles Family, alphabetical list of names (2 items)

Sub-folder 5.7.13 Dates of correspondence and articles (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.7.14 Note on James Billson, Mrs. Metcalf (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.7.15 Miscellaneous names, locations (2 items)

Sub-folder 5.7.16 Questions, comments (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.7.17 Notes and quotations, including Mrs. R. L. Stevenson on Typee and Omoo (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.7.18 Miscellaneous notes (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.7.19 Contacts in Pittsfield, Boston, and Cambridge, MA (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.7.20 Notes on correspondence, chronology (2 items)

Sub-folder 5.7.21 Notes, reminders, contacts (2 items)

5: Folder 8

Melville Biography

Sub-folder 5.8.1 Notes from American Clipper Ships on METEOR with marginalia (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.8.2 Anecdote from “Smith’s Sketch,” Melville at Balance Rock, music box (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.8.3 List of books (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.8.4 Notes on identity of “Long Ghost” (2 items)

Sub-folder 5.8.5 Lyrics for songs in Moby-Dick (3 items)

Sub-folder 5.8.6 Transcript of clipping listing Melville among passengers aboard ship SOUTHAMPTON (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.8.7 Miscellaneous notes     (2 items)

Sub-folder 5.8.8 List of people Melville met in Mediterranean (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.8.9 Notes on Henry Hayes Lockwood (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.8.10 Melville anecdotes (3 items)

Sub-folder 5.8.11 People known to Herman Melville

5: Folder 9

Melville’s Books and Papers

(5 items)

5: Folder 10

Melville’s Literary Work

Sub-folder 5.10.1 Note on Israel Potter source (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.10.2 Miscellaneous notes on scraps of paper (6 items)

Sub-folder 5.10.3 Notes on Hawthorne, Cramer, others (2 items)

Sub-folder 5.10.4 Notes on Hawthorne letter (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.10.5 Note on letter to Wiley and Putnam (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.10.6 List of Mardi reviews (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.10.7 Transcripts, notes on reviews of Mardi and Typee (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.10.8 Modern Language Notes (periodical) January 1944 with pieces on Melville (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.10.9 Notes on search for books owned by Melville (5 items)

Sub-folder 5.10.10 Notes on possible Typee source (2 items)

Sub-folder 5.10.11 Notes on and copies of Melville’s poems (7 items)

Sub-folder 5.10.12 Notes on Melville’s correspondence

5: Folder 11

Leyda’s Research

Sub-folder 5.11.1 Notes on possible sources (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.11.2 New York Library Handbook (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.11.3 Note on Clarel review (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.11.4 Correspondence with James T. Babb at Yale University Library (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.11.5 University of California Library notice with notes (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.11.6 Various notes (4 items)

Sub-folder 5.11.7 Notes on Ezra Ames (2 items)

Sub-folder 5.11.8 New York Public Library slips for Owen Chase Narrative and Redburn (2 items)

Sub-folder 5.11.9 Notes on John Paul Jones, John Marr (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.11.10 Notes on Hawthorne, Long Ghost (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.11.11 Notes on “mast-head meditations” (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.11.12 Notes on Clarel (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.11.13 Transcriptions of Melvilles’s Bible marginalia (2 items)

Sub-folder 5.11.14 Notes on text of Billy Budd (1 item)

5: Folder 12

Books: Reviews, Sales                                    

Sub-folder 5.12.1 Book reviews (2 items)

Sub-folder 5.12. 2 New York Times book review (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.12.3 Article on Moby-Dick, Jonathan Bourne Whaling Museum (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.12.4 Advertisement of first editions of nineteenth-century authors (1 item)

Sub-folder 5.12.5 Reviews of The Melville Log (2 items)

5: Folder 13

Melville Log Material not found in “Melville Log” folder

Sub-folder 5.13.3 People known to Melville

Series II:

Jay Leyda left a box of papers with a friend during his peripatetic life. The contents of this collection comprise a wide assortment of materials and subjects of interest to Jay Leyda. One folder, labeled “Melville Log,” contained material concerning Leyda’s research and planning of that work, but also contained a variety of unrelated material. The rest of the papers range over a variety of subjects and were apparently packed randomly into this box.

In creating this finding aid, I have kept the papers in the “Melville Log” folder separate simply because Leyda labeled them in that manner. Scholars seeking information on Leyda’s research into Melville’s life and work should therefore seek it in both the “Melville Log” folder and the other Melville categories.

Much of the material contained herein is difficult or impossible to date with any certainty. Many of the individual sheets of paper have notes on several very different subjects related only by Leyda’s interest in them. I have categorized each piece according to its predominant subject, but those seeking minutia are encouraged to explore the entire collection carefully.

Detailed Container List

BOX 6: The Melville Log (9 folders)

6: Folder 1

Original file folder labeled “For the Log”

6: Folder 2

Organization of The Melville Log        

Sub-folder 6.2.1 Notes on organization (1 item)

Sub-folder 6.2.2 Notes on problems documenting Melville’s life (1 item)

Sub-folder 6.2.3 Notes on surviving manuscripts (6 items)

Sub-folder 6.2.4 List of Melville diaries (1 item)

Sub-folder 6.2.5 Reference calendar (1 item)

Sub-folder 6.2.6 Research at Abraham Lincoln Association (1 item)

Sub-folder 6.2.7 Quotations relating to organization of The Melville Log (3 items)

6: Folder 3

Printing Process                                                         

Sub-folder 6.3.1 Images (1 item)

Sub-folder 6.3.2 Lists of images, various notes (3 items)

Sub-folder 6.3.3 Timeline of periodical sources (1 item)

Sub-folder 6.3.4 Notes on galley; source for Mardi (1 item)

Sub-folder 6.3.5 Notes on galleys (2 items)

Sub-folder 6.3.6 Changes to galleys (1 item)

Sub-folder 6.3.7 Lists of pages, dates, 1 on back of script (3 items)

Sub-folder 6.3.8 Notes and questions for proofs (1 item)

Sub-folder 6.3.9 Notes, questions, corrections (1 item)

Sub-folder 6.3.10 Various notes (1 item)

6: Folder 4

Melville in the South Pacific

Sub-folder 6.4.1 Note on Medical Journal of Frigate UNITED STATES (1 item)

Sub-folder 6.4.2 Crew lists for UNITED STATES, LUCY ANN, ACUSHNET, Notes (1 item)

Sub-folder 6.4.3 Transcript of ACUSHNET’S final cargo 1845 (1 item)

Sub-folder 6.4.4 List of logbooks to be found (1 item)

Sub-folder 6.4.5 Notes on CHARLES AND HENRY logbooks (1 item)

Sub-folder 6.4.6 Transcripts of articles in South Pacific periodicals 1843-1853 (3 items)

6: Folder 5

Plates for The Melville Log

(4 items)

6: Folder 6

Articles on Melville     

(15 items)

6: Folder 7

Melville Society Newsletters

(21 items)

6: Folder 8

Copies of Herman Melville Correspondence

Sub-folder 6.8.1 Wiley and Patterson (1 item)

Sub-folder 6.8.2 John Romyn Brodhead (5 items)

Sub-folder 6.8.3 Richard Bentley (4 items)

Sub-folder 6.8.4 Evert Duyckinck (1 item)

Sub-folder 6.8.5 Haveland Ellis, notes (1 item)

Sub-folder 6.8.6 Professor McLanahan (1 item)

Sub-folder 6.8.7 Unidentified: Duyckinck? (1 item)

Sub-folder 6.8.8 Ben W. Austin (1 item)

Sub-folder 6.8.9 George Putnam (1 item)

Sub-folder 6.8.10 Excerpts from Melville/Duyckinck letters (1 item)

Sub-folder 6.8.11 Melville/Duyckinck social notes (4 items)

Sub-folder 6.8.12 Calendar of Melville letters in Duyckinck collection (1 item)

Sub-folder 6.8.13 Duyckinck (5 items)

Sub-folder 6.8.14 Editors of Literary World (1 item)

Sub-folder 6.8.15 Bentley Brodhead (1 item)

Sub-folder 6.8.16 Notes on Melville letters (2 items)

6: Folder 9

Various unrelated items found in The Melville Log folder

(6 items)

 

Series II:

Jay Leyda left a box of papers with a friend during his peripatetic life. The contents of this collection comprise a wide assortment of materials and subjects of interest to Jay Leyda. One folder, labeled “Melville Log,” contained material concerning Leyda’s research and planning of that work, but also contained a variety of unrelated material. The rest of the papers range over a variety of subjects and were apparently packed randomly into this box.

In creating this finding aid, I have kept the papers in the “Melville Log” folder separate simply because Leyda labeled them in that manner. Scholars seeking information on Leyda’s research into Melville’s life and work should therefore seek it in both the “Melville Log” folder and the other Melville categories.

Much of the material contained herein is difficult or impossible to date with any certainty. Many of the individual sheets of paper have notes on several very different subjects related only by Leyda’s interest in them. I have categorized each piece according to its predominant subject, but those seeking minutia are encouraged to explore the entire collection carefully.

Detailed Container List

BOX 7: Emily Dickinson, Russian Composers, including Sergei Rachmaninoff,  Sergei Eisenstein, Jay Leyda (4 folders)

7: Folder 1

Emily Dickinson

Sub-folder 7.1.1 Photostats of materiel from Goodell manuscript (1 item)

Sub-folder 7.1.2 Copy of Susan Tolman’s “Journal for the Missionaries” (1 item)

Sub-folder 7.1.3 List of Dickinson poems with dates, locations (1 item)

Sub-folder 7.1.4 Text of and notes on essay “Prose Fragments” by Millicent Todd Bingham (1 item)

Sub-folder 7.1.5 Script for CBS Radio Division “Invitation to Learning” April 24, 1955, on Emily Dickinson (1 item)

Sub-folder 7.1.6 Collected articles on Emily Dickinson (4 items)

Sub-folder 7.1.7 Dickinson poem transcripts (1 item)

7: Folder 2

Russian Film and Music

Sub-folder 7.2.1 Articles and notes on Eisenstein and Soviet Film (21 items)

Sub-folder 7.2.2 Copies of letters from A. Skryabin [sic] (1 item)

Sub-folder 7.2.3 Various notes, articles, and a copy of music in letters from Rachmaninoff (4 items)

7: Folder 3

Personal and Business Papers

Sub-folder 7.3.1 Original Memorandum of Agreement for writing of Sergei Rachmaninoff: His Life and Music (1 item)

Sub-folder 7.3.2 Military service records (7 items)

Sub-folder 7.3.3 Various contracts, financial records (7 items)

Sub-folder 7.3.4 Letters regarding the publication of others’ works (4 items)

7: Folder 4

Miscellaneous

Sub-folder 7.4.1 Dramatic dialogue (1 item)

Sub-folder 7.4.2 Notes on various nineteenth-century authors (1 item)

Sub-folder 7.4.3 Leyda review of The American Renaissance by F. O. Mathiesson (1 item)

Sub-folder 7.4.4 Copies of correspondence, articles, and anecdotes (10 items)

Sub-folder 7.4.5 Miscellaneous research notes (5 items)

Sub-folder 7.4.6 Various research and personal notes; spiral notebook (28 items)

Sub-folder 7.4.7 Miscellaneous collected articles (35 items)

Sub-folder 7.4.8 Assorted material of a more random nature than is usual even for Mr. Leyda (70 items)

 

Series II:

Jay Leyda left a box of papers with a friend during his peripatetic life. The contents of this collection comprise a wide assortment of materials and subjects of interest to Jay Leyda. One folder, labeled “Melville Log,” contained material concerning Leyda’s research and planning of that work, but also contained a variety of unrelated material. The rest of the papers range over a variety of subjects and were apparently packed randomly into this box.

In creating this finding aid, I have kept the papers in the “Melville Log” folder separate simply because Leyda labeled them in that manner. Scholars seeking information on Leyda’s research into Melville’s life and work should therefore seek it in both the “Melville Log” folder and the other Melville categories.

Much of the material contained herein is difficult or impossible to date with any certainty. Many of the individual sheets of paper have notes on several very different subjects related only by Leyda’s interest in them. I have categorized each piece according to its predominant subject, but those seeking minutia are encouraged to explore the entire collection carefully.

Detailed Container List

BOX 8: Odd size items: mostly research notes (4 folders)

8: Folder 1

Research and personal notes on 3x5 paper

8: Folder 2

Oversize Research notes on Melville Family

8: Folder 3

Notes and Library slips bundled in rubber bands

8: Folder 4

3x5 Accordion folder filled with notes

 

Series II:

Jay Leyda left a box of papers with a friend during his peripatetic life. The contents of this collection comprise a wide assortment of materials and subjects of interest to Jay Leyda. One folder, labeled “Melville Log,” contained material concerning Leyda’s research and planning of that work, but also contained a variety of unrelated material. The rest of the papers range over a variety of subjects and were apparently packed randomly into this box.

In creating this finding aid, I have kept the papers in the “Melville Log” folder separate simply because Leyda labeled them in that manner. Scholars seeking information on Leyda’s research into Melville’s life and work should therefore seek it in both the “Melville Log” folder and the other Melville categories.

Much of the material contained herein is difficult or impossible to date with any certainty. Many of the individual sheets of paper have notes on several very different subjects related only by Leyda’s interest in them. I have categorized each piece according to its predominant subject, but those seeking minutia are encouraged to explore the entire collection carefully.

Detailed Container List

BOX 9: Offprints (22 folders)

9: Folder 1

[American Historical Association], Publishing the Papers of Great Men (December 1954)

(1 item)

9: Folder 2

[Amherst Chamber of Commerce], Amherst, Massachusetts: A College Town in New England

(1 item)

9: Folder 3

Antiquarian Bookman (July 17, 1952)

(2 items)

9: Folder 4

Bond, “Melville and Two Years Before the Mast,” Harvard Library Bulletin, 7 (Autumn 1953)

(1 item)

9: Folder 5

Boyce, “Modern Literary Manuscripts in the Morgan Library,” PMLA, 67 (February 1952)

(1 item)

9: Folder 6

Butterfield, “George Lippard and his Secret Brotherhood,” PMHB, 79 (July 1955)

(1 item)

9: Folder 7

Cahoon, Herman Melville: A Checklist of Books and Manuscripts (New York, 1951)

(1 item)

9: Folder 8

[Corporation of Yaddo], Yaddo (c. 1951)

(1 item)

9: Folder 9

Dickinson Genealogy: on Mother’s Side

(1 item)

9: Folder 10

Hillway, “Billy Budd: Melville’s Human Sacrifice,” The Pacific Spectator, 6 (Summer 1952)

(1 item)

9: Folder 11

Johnson, “Emily Dickinson: Creating the Poems,” Harvard Library Bulletin, 2 (Autumn 1953)

(1 item)

9: Folder 12

Johnson, “Establishing a Text: The Emily Dickinson Papers,” Studies in Bibliography, 5 (July 1952-1953)

(1 item)

9: Folder 13

Leyda, “Another Friendly Critic for Melville,” New England Quarterly, 27 (June 1954)

(9 items)

9: Folder 14

Leyda, “The Engine Melville,” BPL Quarterly, 27 (October 1953)

(1 item)

9: Folder 15

Paltsits, Family Correspondence of Herman Melville, 1830-1904 (New York, 1909)

(1 item)

9: Folder 16

Todd, Witchcraft in New England (Connecticut Valley Historical Society, 1906)

(1 item)

9: Folder 17

Wadsworth, Politics in Religion (Philadelphia, 1854)

(1 item)

9: Folder 18

Wadsworth, Development and Discipline (Philadelphia, 1857)

(1 item)

9: Folder 19

Wadsworth, A Mother’s Sorrow (Philadelphia, 1864)

(1 item)

9: Folder 20

Wadsworth, Self-Knowledge (Philadelphia, 1860)

(1 item)

9: Folder 21

Wadsworth, God’s Culture. A Thanksgiving Sermon (Philadelphia, 1860)

(1 item)

9: Folder 22

Ward, “Emily Dickinson and T. W. Higginson,” BPL Quarterly (January 1953)

(1 item)

 

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Fellowships and Scholarships


Melville Society Archive
Walter E. Bezanson Fellowship
 
 
The Melville Society, under the auspices of the Melville Society Cultural Project in New Bedford, offers an annual fellowship to help a scholar undertake research on Herman Melville at the Society’s Archive in the Research Library of the Whaling Museum in New Bedford, Massachusetts.

 

Click here for more information and application details.

 

New York Public Library
Short-term Research Fellowships

 

Graduate students or other affiliated academics whose work would benefit from visiting the Manuscripts and Archives Division to view collections such as the Gansevoort-Lansing collection, and Duyckinck family papers are encouraged to apply.

 

Click here for more information and application details.

From Our Photo Collections

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Woodlawn Cemetary

WoodlawnWoodlawn Cemetary - final resting place of Herman, his wife, Elizabeth, and other family members. Click here to view photos of the gravesites.

125th Anniversary Celebration

125th Woodlawn

A celebration of Melville's life at Woodlawn Cemetary on the 125th anniversary of his passing.

Lansingburgh Historical Society

Melville House

Melville lived for nine years in this Lansingburgh house. It was here that he wrote Typee and Omoo

Berkshire Historical Society

ArrowheadMelville's Arrowhead home and farm in Pittsfield, MA where he wrote Moby-Dick and lived for most of the 1850s.