The Eaton Portrait

Herman Melville JOEaton 95ppi 250wBy permission of Houghton Library, Harvard University: 61Z-4

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Melville Society Cultural Project

Melville Society and New Bedford Whaling Museum Cultural Project The New Bedford Whaling Museum in collaboration with The Melville Society is the established home of the Melville Society Cultural Project and Melville Society Archive. The Melville Society Archive is housed at the New Bedford Whaling Museum's Research Library, where significant works from this collection are also on display. The Melville Society Cultural Project also sponsors a book donation program and presents exciting annual events including the Moby-Dick Marathon and a Birthday Lecture.

The Melville Society Archive

Description of the contents of box 5

The download link listed at the beginning of the box description
is linked to a Word file containing that same description.

Files:

Melville Society Box 5

From Donald Yannella, Secretary-Treasurer

1) Melville Society ledger of members, April, 1969-December, 1976
2) Extracts 30, Letters, Notes, Circulars, and Editor’s Comments

a. Published Extracts

i. Jeanne Howes, “Melville’s Loom”
ii. Dan Burne Jones, “Moby-Dick: The Unused Kent Illustrations”
iii. “Moby-Dick and Mailer’s Naked and the Dead”
iv. Hennig Cohen, “Of Rama and Queequeg”
v. George Monteiro, “Clarel in the Catholic World”
vi. Curtis Dahl, “Of Foul Weather and Bulkington”
vii. Margaret Wiley Marshall, “A Footnote to ‘Billy Budd’”
viii. George Monteiro, “More on Herman Melville in the 1890s”

b. Unpublished Extracts

i. G.M. van Rossum on Dutch editions of Moby-Dick

c. Some other publications and documents

i. William Spangler, “Rockwell Kent and Moby Dick,” The Kent Collector, III – No. 4 (Spring 1977)
ii. Photos of Melville’s grave by Jeanne Howes
iii. New article of Ted Kennedy visiting Arrowhead

3) Extracts 31, Letters, Notes, Circulars, and Editor’s Comments

a. Published Extracts

i. Johannes D. Bergmann, “The New York Morning News and Typee”
ii. “Additions to the Melville Log”
iii. Donald Drury, “Melville, Pip, and Murray’s Grammar”
iv. Paul Bresnick, “Putnam’s Whale”
v. Daniel A. Wells, “Melville Allusions in The Southern Literary Messenger”
vi. George Monteiro, “More on ‘More on Herman Melville in the 1890s’”
vii. George Monteiro, “The Attack of the Ann Alexander: A Contemporary Reprinting of the Panama Herald Account”
viii. Carol B. Gartner, “Rau Errol Fox’s ‘The Confidence Man’”
ix. Dan Wells, “A Second Supplement to the Mailloux-Parker Checklist of Melville Allusions: The Southern Literary Messenger”
x. Frederick and Joyce Kennedy, “Additions to the Melville Log"

b. Unpublished Extracts

i. On Marrio D’Avanzo on “The House Top”
ii. Stanton Garner, “Melville and the Trunkmaker”

c. Some other publications and documents

i. Letter from Herman Ganseforth, Ioph, Malaysia (August 8, 1977)
ii. Letters to Donald Yannella from Hans Bergmann, Tyrus Hillway, George Monteiro, Merton M. Sealts, Jr., etc.

4) Extracts 32, Letters, Notes, Circulars, and Editor’s Comments

a. Published Extracts

i. Harrison Hayford on Conrad Aiken’s “Herman Melville”
ii. Nathalia Wright, “Melville’s Longlasting Quarrel,” review of T. Walter Herbert’s Moby-Dick and Calvinism
iii. Daniel Wells, “Melville’s Allusions in The American Whig Review”
iv. Johannes Bergmann’s review of Ann Douglas, The Feminization of American Culture
v. J. R. Hawk, “White-Jacket at the Naval Academy”
vi. Don Drury, “Some Middle Lives of Melville”
vii. Frederick Kennedy, “Samuel Arthur Jones and Herman Melville”

b. Unpublished Extracts

i. Daniel j. Tynan, “Melville’s New Bedford…” [not included]

c. Some other publications and documents

i. J. B. McNamara, Translation of p. 113-121 of Klaus Lanzinger’s Primitivismus und Naturalismus in Prosashaffen Herman Melvilles (1959) [included in folder for Extracts 33]
ii. Letters to Donald Yannella from Harrison Hayford, Harold Lehrman, Sanford Marovitz, Paul Metcalf, Merton M. Sealts, Jr., and G. Thomas Tanselle
iii. Notes on “Me and My Chimney” architecture
iv. “And In Kansas”: Poems by Steve Bench at University of Kansas, “White-Jacket,” “Captain Claret”

5) Extracts 33, Letters, Notes, Circulars, and Editor’s Comments

a. Published Extracts

i. Larry J. Reynolds, “The Pattern of Violence”
ii. Caroline Moseley, “‘Old Virginny’ in Melville’s ‘The Paradise of Bachelors’”
iii. Leslie E. Sheldon, “Another Layer of Miltonic Allusion in Moby-Dick”
iv. Watson Branch, “Melville’s ‘Incompetent World’ in Billy Budd, Sailor” [correspondence and edits in Extracts 34 folder]
v. Sanford Marovitz, “Melville Short Fiction of the ‘Fifties”
vi. George Monteiro, “Emanuel Felix’s ‘Leviathan,’ An Azorean Tribute to Melville”
vii. Everett Emerson, “Apple Tree Tables and Others,” review of Michael T. Gilmore’s The Middle Way (1977)

b. Unpublished Extracts

i. Don Drury, “The Over-Matched Man: Starbuck, Antony, Macbeth”
ii. Thomas F. O’Donnell, “The Fidele on the Hudson: Another Source of The Confidence-Man?"

c. Some other publications and documents

i. William Gibson, “Snivelization,” American Speech, 49 (Fall-Winter 1974): 303-4
ii. Frederick Kennedy, Letters between Sam Shaw and Lizzie Melville
iii. photographs

6) Extracts 34, Letters, Notes, Circulars, and Editor’s Comments (1978)

a. Published Extracts

i. Joyce Deveau Kennedy and Frederick Kennedy, “Elizabeth and Herman, continued from Extracts 33”
ii. David Ketterer, “Censorship and Symbolism in Melville’s Typee”
iii. Watson Branch, “Melville’s ‘Incompetent World’ in Billy Budd, Sailor”
iv. George Monteiro, “Clarel in the International Review”
v. Antonio Manoel dos Santos Silva and Carlos Daghlian, “Three Sermons to the Fishes”

b. Unpublished Extracts

c. Some other publications and documents

i. Letters to Donald Yannella from Gil Wilson and Sanford Marovitz
ii. Obituary of Luther S. Mansfield

7) Extracts 35, Letters, Notes, Circulars, and Editor’s Comments (1978)

a. Published Extracts

i. Joyce Deveau Kennedy and Frederick Kennedy, “Elizabeth and Herman, continued from Extracts 33”
ii. David Ketterer, “Censorship and Symbolism in Melville’s Typee”
iii. Watson Branch, “Melville’s ‘Incompetent World’ in Billy Budd, Sailor”
iv. George Monteiro, “Clarel in the International Review”
v. Antonio Manoel dos Santos Silva and Carlos Daghlian, “Three Sermons to the Fishes

b. Unpublished Extracts

c. Some other publications and documents

i. Letters to Donald Yannella from Gil Wilson and Sanford Marovitz
ii. Obituary of Luther Mansfield

8) Extracts 36, Letters, Notes, Circulars, and Editor’s Comments (1978)

a. Published Extracts

i. Joyce Deveau Kennedy and Frederick Kennedy, “Samuel Hay Savage and Herman Melville 1847-1851”
ii. Stanton Garner, “A Rustic Beauty Among the Highborn Dames of the Court: Melville in the Customhouse, 1881-1882”
iii. Daniel A. Wells, “Melville’s Allusions in The Democratic Review”
iv. Leslie E. Sheldon, “Another Layer of Miltonic Allusion in Moby-Dick”
v. Johannes D. Bergmann, “New Great Traditions,” review of Georges-Michel Sarotte’s Like a Brother, Like a Lover (1978)
vi. Donald Drury, “Melville and the Beard (?) of John Brown”
vii. Joyce Deveau Kennedy and Frederick Kennedy, “Elizabeth and Herman”

b. Unpublished Extracts

c. Some other publications and documents

i. Xeroxed photocopies of Herman Melville’s letters to Sam Shaw
ii. Letters to Donald Yanella from Hennig Cohen, Stanton Garner, Joyce and Fred Kennedy, Walter Kring, and Merton M. Sealts, Jr.

9) Extracts 37, Letters, Notes, Circulars, and Editor’s Comments (1979)

a. Published Extracts

i. Maria L. D’Avanzo, “Anubis and ‘The Hyena’ in Moby-Dick”
ii. Wilson Heflin, review of Faith Pullen, New Perspectives On Melville
iii. Joyce Sparer Adler, (Melville Society abstract), “The ‘Infinite Entanglement’ of Slavery and War in Melville’s Art: An Imaginary Slide Show
iv. Carolyn Karcher, “The Confidence-Man: His Masquerade: An Apocalyptic Indictment of Slavery and Racism”
v. John A. Williams, Abstract [panel on 19th-Century Writers and Slavery]
vi. Brian Higgins, “Supplement to Herman Melville: An Annotated Bibliography: Volume I: 1846-1930”

b. Unpublished Extracts

c. Some other publications and documents

i. Xeroxed photocopies of Herman Melville’s letters to Sam Shaw
ii. Letters to Donald Yanella from Mario D’Avanzo, Stanton Garner, John Gretchko, Carolyn Karcher, Claude Richard, and Merton M. Sealts, Jr.
iii. Miscellaneous photos illustrating panel on slavery and racism.

10) Extracts 38, Letters, Notes, Circulars, and Editor’s Comments

a. Published Extracts

i. John Dean, “The American Nuclei: Moby Dick and Huckleberry Finn”
ii. John Gretchko, “Herman Melville Discovers Elijah Burritt”
iii. Edward Stone, “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest and Moby-Dick”
iv. G[loria]. Young, “Melville’s Archetypal ‘Wise Old Man’”
v. George Monteiro, “A Melville Review in the Chicago Inter Ocean”
vi. Thomas Philbrick, “A Melville Home is Damaged”
vii. John Middlebrook, “Eat First, Then Esthetics”

b. Correspondence between Donald Yannella and Tony Magistrale, Jonathan Middlebrook, and Gloria Young

11) Extracts 39, Letters, Notes, Circulars, and Editor’s Comments

a. Published Extracts

i. Frederick and Joyce Kennedy, “Elizabeth Shaw Melville and Samuel Hay Savage, 1847-1853”
ii. George Monteiro, “Fugitive References to Melville, 1851-1900”
iii. Tom Quirk, “Two Sources in Melville’s Confidence-Man”
iv. Mary K Madison, “Fanny Trollope’s Nephew Edits Typee”

b. Correspondence between Donald Yannella and Ross Beharriel, Hennig Cohen, John Gretchko, Phillippe Jaworski, Frederick and Joyce Kennedy, Mary K. Madison, George Monteiro, Patrick Quinn, Tom Quirk, and Viola Sachs

12) Extracts 40, Letters, Notes, Circulars, and Editor’s Comments

a. Published Extracts

i. Margaret Wiley Marshall, “Arichanda and Billy Budd’
ii. Nelson Smith, “Four New London Reviews”
iii. Hershel Parker, “A Modest Proposal To Improve the Reviewing of Books and Articles on Melville and To Foster Communication Among Melville Scholars and Critics”
iv. Harold Farwell and Norman Andrews, “Britten’s Billy Budd in San Francisco”

b. Correspondence between Donald Yannella and Christopher Durer, Harold Farwell, Tyrus Hillway, Alice P. Kenney, Margaret Wiley Marshall, Viola Sachs, Robert J. Schwendinger, and Nelson Smith

13) Extracts 41, Letters, Notes, Circulars, and Editor’s Comments

a. Published Extracts

i. Frederick and Joyce Kennedy, “The United States Navy and White-Jacket: An Untold Story”
ii. Watson Branch, “A Glossary of Melville’s Literary Terms”
iii. Shirley M. Dettlaff, “Ionian Form and Esau’s Waste: Melville’s View of Art in Clarel”
iv. Thomas Heffernan, “The Whale Has No Famous Author?”
v. Stanton Garner, “Rosmarine: Melville’s ‘Pebbles,’ Ben Jonson’s Masque of Blackness, and A Trifle Concerning T. S. Eliot”
vi. Edward Stone, “More on the Whiteness of the Whale”

b. Correspondence between Donald Yannella and Daniel Aaron, Stanford Apseloff, Hennig Cohen, Christopher Durer, Joseph Flibbert, Stanton Garner, Thomas Heffernan, Jon Hendricks, Frederick and Joyce Kennedy, Tony King, Robert G. Newman, Egbert Oliver, Kay Sadghi, and Dan Wells

14) Extracts 42, Letters, Notes, Circulars, and Editor’s Comments

a. Published Extracts (and drafts)

i. Martin Wank, “Precis of ‘Moby Dick Revealed’”
ii. Wilson Heflin, “Researching in New Bedford, Circa 1947” with photos
iii. “The Scottish Connection”
iv. David K. Titus, “Herman Melville at the Albany Academy”
v. Joel Myerson, Review of Walter Donald Kring, Henry Whitney Bellows
vi. Arnold Rampersad, Review of Carolyn Karcher, Shadow Over the Promised Land
vii. Notices

b. Correspondence between Donald Yannella and John Bowen, Gail Coffler, Stanton Garner, Wilson Heflin, Robert Rulon Miller, Egbert Oliver, Hershel Parker, Tom Quirk, P. Rodin, Haskell Springer, David Titus, Martin Wank, and Thomas Woodson

15) Extracts 43, Letters, Notes, Circulars, and Editor’s Comments

a. Published Extracts (and drafts)

i. Joyce and Frederick Kennedy, “In Pursuit of Manuscripts: True Yarns, or Seek and Ye Shall Find”
ii. Wilson Heflin, “More Researching in New Bedford”
iii. Lauriat Lane, “Melville’s Second Whaler”
iv. Joyce and Frederick Kennedy, New England Historical and Genealogical Register and photos

b. Correspondence between Donald Yannella and Susan Baker, James Barbour, John Bowen, Richard Brodhead, Harrison Hayford, Carol S. Horner, Joyce and Frederick Kennedy, Lauriat Lane, Harold Lehrman, Robert Milder, Tom Quirk, and Edwin Schneidman

16) Extracts 44, Notes, Circulars, and Editor’s Comments

a. Published Extracts (and drafts)

i. Howard P. Vincent, review of T. Walter Herbert, Marquesan Encounters
ii. Chowder and Miscellanea
iii. Tom Quirk, “Man-Traps and Melville”
iv. S. C. Baker, “Two Notes on Browning Echoes in Clarel”
v. Thomas Woodson, “Note”
vi. Stanton Garner, “His (More Than) Fifty Years of Exile, and Fanny’s Toe”
vii. Gail Coffler, “Melville, Dana, Allston: Analogues in Lectures on Art”

17) Extracts 45, Letters, Notes, Circulars, and Editor’s Comments

a. Published Extracts (and some drafts)

i. 1981 MLA Meeting Call for Papers: “Melville and the Reader”
ii. Sanford E. Marovitz, “Melville’s Problematic ‘Being’”
iii. William M. Ramsey, “Wisdom on the Fidele”
iv. John Wenke, “Melville’s Mardi: Philosophy and the Exhaustion of the Self”
v. Kay Kier, “Elizabeth Shaw Melville and the Stedmans: 1891-1894”
vi. Wayne Kvam, “The Melville Legacy in Hochhuth’s Tod eines Jagers”
vii. Brian Higgins, “A Centennial Essay by Virginia Woolf”
viii. Bruce Bebb, “A Statue for Bugsy Segal”

b. Correspondence between Donald Yannella and Brian Higgins, Kay Kier, and Wayne Kvam

18) Extracts 46, Letters, Notes, Circulars, and Editor’s Comments

a. Published Extracts (and some drafts)

i. Mary K. Madison, “Hypothetical Friends: The Critics and The Confidence Man”
ii. Review of Edwin S. Schneidman, ed., Endeavors in Psychology: Selections from the Personology of Henry A. Murray
iii. John P. Runden, “Columbia Grammar School: An Overlooked Year in the Lives of Gansevoort and Herman Melville”
iv. “Chowder”
v. James Duban, “Melville’s Use of Irving’s Knickerbocker History in White-Jacket”
vi. Tom Quirk, “More on the Composition of Moby-Dick”
vii. Sanford E. Marovitz, Review of Joyce Sparer Adler, War in Melville’s Imagination

b. Correspondence between Donald Yannella and Joyce and Irving Adler, James Duban, Stanton Garner, Harold Lehrman, Corona Machemer, Mary K. Madison, Sanford E. Marovitz, Dorothee Metlitzki, Robert Milder, Thomas Quirk, John Runden, Gary Scharnhorst, Irene Schwartz, and Merton M. Sealts, Jr.

c. Photograph of Elizabeth Shaw Melville

19) Extracts 47, Letters, Notes, Circulars, and Editor’s Comments

a. Published Extracts

i. Mohamed Elias, “Widow-Burning in Mardi”
ii. Richard S. Moore, “Piranesi, ‘The Blanket,’ and the ‘Mathematical Sublime’ in Moby-Dick”
iii. Peter Hays, “Samson in Moby-Dick, Particular vs. Transcendental”
iv. Stanton Garner, “Allan Melvill to Martin Van Buren on Major Melvill’s Removal”
v. Charles Newmeier, “The Melvilles’ House on E. 26th Street”
vi. R. D. Madison, “Melville’s Edition of Cooper’s History of the Navy”
vii. Dorothee Metlitzki, “A Note on the Letter H in Melville’s Whale”
viii. “Chowder”
ix. June Allison, “The Similes in Moby-Dick: Homer and Melville”
x. Gary Scharnhorst, “Addenda to the Melville Bibliography, 1850-1928”

b. Correspondence between Donald Yannella and June Allison, “Charles,” David Jaffe, Harold Lehrman, R. D. Madison, Richard S. Moore, Gary Scharnhorst, and Gloria Young

20) Extracts 48, Letters, Notes, Circulars, and Editor’s Comments

a. Published Extracts (and some drafts)

i. Robert R. Craven, “‘Roger Starbuck’ (Augustus Comstock) and Moby-Dick”
ii. David G. Hoch, “A Possible Source of Melville’s Confidence-Man”
iii. John Satterfield, “Thomas Wolfe’s Reading of Moby-Dick”
iv. Miscellaneous Sightings
v. Stanton Garner, “Melville and Sandford Gifford”
vi. Deborah Andrews, Review of Thomas F. Heffernan, Stove By A Whale
vii. John Gretchko, “The Glassy-Eyed Hermit”
viii. Peter Kosenko, “The Secret Design of Melville’s Confidence Man”
ix. Daniel Wells, “Melville Allusions in Harper’s New Monthly Magazine 1850-1900”

b. Correspondence between Donald Yannella and Deborah Andrews, Robert Craven, John Gretchko, Thomas F. Heffernan, David Hoch, Peter Kosenko, John Satterfield, and Daniel Wells

c. Loose photos, illustrations

Date 2018-02-04
File Size 30.86 KB
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Melville Society Facebook Posts

Greg Lennes Melville's short story, "The Lightning-Rod Man" (1854) still has lessons for us today. The lightning-rod salesman says that to buy his lighting rods, you will be safe. He is the salesman of our fears. He peddled his wares during storms with dire descriptions of ruin and death. He threatens and tries to bully the main character, who is angered. The ending is the main character "seized it (lightning-rod); I snapped it; I dashed it; I trod it; and dragging the dark lightning-king out of my door, flung his elbowed, copper sceptre after him. But spite of my treatment, and spite of my dissuasive talk of him to my neighbors, the Lightning-rod man still dwells in the land; still travels in storm-time, and drives a brave trade with the fears of man." Here is a video of a reading of the tale by Stacy Carson. It was produced by Sharad Patel and Lily Cox­‐Richard (2015):
"The Lightning-­Rod Man" by Herman Melville, 1854 vimeo.com "The Lightning-­Rod Man" by Herman Melville, 1854 Read by Stacy Carson Produced by Sharad Patel and Lily Cox­‐Richard
2018-02-18T16:52:37+0000
Greg Lennes
Diane Samuels: The Whale and Other Texts Diane Samuels: The Whale and Other Texts Diane Samuels: The Whale and Other Texts
Feb 7 - March 15, 2018
RECEPTION: Thursday, March 8, 6:00 - 9:00 pm; Artist Talk 7:30 pm

Exhibition at UMass Dartmouth University Art Gallery in Downtown New Bedford, “Diane Samuels: The Whale and Other Texts” is centered around the 8’ wide by 47’ long artwork Moby-Dick, or The Whale. This mesmerizing large scale piece appears to be floating on the gallery floor and spilling off the wall, reflecting on the ocean nearby, the location for the Melville’s famous novel.
Pittsburgh based Diane Samuels who often uses text as a element in her visual vocabulary this time creates waves with her meticulous hand-transcriptions created using all of the 701 pages in the novel. Remnants of archival paper and drawings have been recycled and painted over and, in places, drawn and collaged using images that pertain to the specific text. Each page of the book (also exhibited at the gallery) is hand-written as a horizontal row of the drawing, starting with “Call me Ishmael” at the top of the artwork.

Samuels chose Moby-Dick, or The Whale because of Melville’s descriptions of confrontations with “the other” and his archiving and cataloguing of information about whales and the world. In Chapter Three, Ishmael and Queequeg share a room and a bed at the Spouter-Inn. Ishmael describes his terror in meeting Queequeg. Despite cultural, racial, and language differences, the chapter ends with Ishmael’s statement, “I turned in, and never slept better in my life.”

Accompanying this installation is the compressed sound of the artist reading out loud and hand-transcribing each page, creating a layered “audio block”; a dense sound comprised of words and pages, along with the ambient sounds of the artist’s studio. The audio block is the length of the longest page of the book.

Other artworks also surprise visitors with their intricate hand-transcription in microscript. The Arabian Nights traces the stories told by Scheherazade over 10,000 fragments of papers painted in shades of indigo and crimson and edged in gold. The piece is a literal and figurative “magic carpet” whose central panel is bathed in the blood of the book’s unfortunate heroines and cloaked in the mysterious glow of night.
Salman Rushdie’s “Midnight’s Children,” also visually reflects the content of the book, creating a unique composition made from 1001 pieces of paper made in India and joined to form a map of India on August 15, 1947, its date of independence. The “midnight’s children” of the book’s title are the 1001 children born in the first hour of Indian independence.

The exhibition is open through March 15, 2018, with the reception on Thursday, March 8, 6:00 - 9:00 pm. The artist talk, as well as audio recording will begin at 7:30 pm.
The Whale and Other Text was curated by Viera Levitt, UMass Dartmouth Gallery Director, born in Slovakia, where she had assisted Diane in her 1998 sound based site-specific installation for the Synagogue - Centre for Contemporary Art in Trnava.

Thanks to Kris Nuzzi and the Pavel Zoubok Gallery for their wonderful collaboration on this exhibition.

Bio:
Diane Samuels is a visual artist, with studio and public art practices based in Pittsburgh. In both she uses other peoples’ words and handwriting as her literal and figurative raw material. She builds works that accrete from community engagements, layer by layer: layers made of words from interviews and informal conversations with people on the street, in cafes, in their homes; layers made of places from castings, drawings, photographs, audio, maps; and layers made from archival documents, narratives of events, histories, memoirs, folk tales, and literature. She has made drawings by writing out the texts of entire novels in micro-handwriting, converted a two-story glass pedestrian bridge into an anthology of phrases about looking at the world closely, and created artist’s books from sessions transcribing storytellers.
Diane's permanent site-specific artworks include Luminous Manuscript (Center for Jewish History New York) and Lines of Sight (Brown University). Luminous Manuscript was awarded an IFRAA/Faith & Form Award for Religious Art and Architecture in 2005 and is included in Judith Dupré’s 2007 (Random House) book, Monuments: America’s History in Art and Memory.
Her exhibitions include the Andy Warhol Museum, the Carnegie Museum of Art, the Mattress Factory Museum, the Leo Baeck Institute, the Center for Book Arts, the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, the Contemporary Arts Center of Cincinnati, the Municipal Museum of Art (Gyor, Hungary), the Synagogue Center (Trnava, Slovakia), the Bernheimer Realschule (Buttenhausen, Germany), and the Czech Museum of Fine Arts.
Diane's work is in public and private collections including the Carnegie Museum of Art, Bank of New York Mellon, Reed College, Municipal Museum of Art (Gyor, Hungary), the Ruth and Marvin Sackner Archive of Concrete and Visual Poetry.
Samuels holds both a bachelor’s and master’s degree in fine arts from Carnegie Mellon University, a diploma from the Institute in Arts Administration at Harvard University and has received honorary doctorates from Seton Hill University and Chatham University. She is also co-founder of City of Asylum Pittsburgh, which provides sanctuary to writers in exile. Samuels is a former board member of the Carnegie Museum of Art and the National Catholic Center for Holocaust Education, and is a Distinguished Daughter of Pennsylvania. In 2013 she was recipient of a Rockefeller Bellagio Residency in Italy and an American Academy in Jerusalem Fellowship.
Diane Samuels works with the Pavel Zoubok Gallery in New York City.

Image: Moby Dick, Or The Whale, Herman Melville, 2015
Ink on handmade paper, 96 x 564 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Pavel Zoubok Gallery. Photo by Thomas Little

University Art Gallery
College of Visual and Performing Arts
UMass Dartmouth, 715 Purchase Street, New Bedford, MA 02740
Contact: Viera Levitt, Gallery Director and Exhibition Curator, vlevitt@umassd.edu
Gallery Hours: 9 am - 6 pm daily, closed on major holidays.
Open until 9 pm during AHA! Nights (the second Thursday of every month).
www.umassd.edu/universityartgallery
2018-02-19T16:31:14+0000
Greg Lennes Kimble Bromley, Professor of Art at North Dakota State University, will exhibit his Moby-Dick painting series at the Muscatine Art Center (Iowa) from February 15th through April 12th, 2018. 2018-02-19T15:41:59+0000
Greg Lennes From Rhode Island Public Radio: "One Square Mile: Walk A Mile In Ishmael's New Bedford" by John Bender:
One Square Mile: Walk A Mile In Ishmael's New Bedford wbur.org New Bedford is the destination for devotees of one famous literary leviathan -- Herman Melville's "Moby-Dick."
2018-02-19T15:32:37+0000
Greg Lennes From Aeon: Melville and Financial World by Matt Seybold.
Herman Melville "Confidence is the indispensable basis of all sorts of business transactions. Without it, commerce between man and man, as between country and country, would, like a watch, run down and stop."
—from "The Confidence-Man" by Herman Melville

via Aeon
2018-02-19T14:17:06+0000
Meredith Farmer We're happy to announce the first CFP for our MLA panels at MLA 2019! CFP: READING THE CONFIDENCE-MAN TODAY What types of interpretations come up when someone reads the The Confidence-Man in light of recent events? Presenters should offer short, reflective pieces (8 minutes) that provoke discussion. Although a lack of faith (or confidence) in political institutions is a major part of news reports today, presenters may focus on any of the topics brought up in Melville’s book, including stocks and finance, religious organizations, charity, racial identity, belief, and other considerations. Other approaches could include reflections on reading historically or the dynamics of re-reading today. Please send 250-word abstracts and brief bios to Rodrigo Lazo at rlazo@uci.edu by March 13.
2018-02-16T16:16:40+0000
Greg Lennes Melvillean Philosophy (Humor): "There are unknown worlds of knowledge in brutes; and whenever you mark a horse, or a dog, with a peculiarly mild, calm, deep-seated eye, be sure he is an Aristotle or a Kant, tranquilly speculating upon the mysteries in man. No philosophers so thoroughly comprehend us as dogs and horses." Redburn. His First Voyage - Chapter XL. :) 2018-02-16T21:00:37+0000
Robert Sandberg MLA Conference - 2019 - Chicago: The Melville Society's "Call for Papers" is now available on the Melville Society website
The Melville Society - Call for Papers: MLA 2019 - Reading The Confidence-Man Today & Melville’s Quarrel with Modernity melvillesociety.org A society dedicated to the study and appreciation of the nineteenth-century American author Herman Melville
2018-02-17T16:49:58+0000
Greg Lennes "Moby Dick Deckle Edges Spotlight Tour "(March 16th) - Frank Stella Artwork - discussion led by Robert K. Wallace at Pizzuti Collection in Columbus, Ohio:
Moby Dick Deckle Edges Spotlight Tour pizzuticollection.org Join us on March 16 for a spotlight tour with Professor Robert K. Wallace. Robert will discuss the Moby Dick Deckle Edges prints in the context of other works by Stella on view in the Lines/Edges: Frank Stella On Paper exhibition.
2018-02-17T15:43:39+0000
Eileen Valentino Flaxman When I joined The Melville Society FB page last August, you were just breaking a thousand followers. And now you're about to break 2,000. Congratulations! Here is my latest contribution from my project to write a poem for every chapter in Moby-Dick. (Lines from the text are in quotations.) Chapter 59 - Squid. -- Plenty of action and violence takes place in this novel. But there are also days of calm . . . floating on a glassy sea without swells or even the promise of a leviathan and with no chatter from a listless crew . . . A 'profound hush' surrounds the Pequod as it drifts in the middle of nowhere, with 'a stillness almost preternatural spread over the sea'. At such a time, what goes on inside a sailor's mind? Thoughts of home? Other ways to earn a living? Ennui? As a man looks out over endless nothingness, do thoughts churn busily inside his skull . . . or is Ismael an Anomaly?
2018-02-16T18:27:58+0000
Meredith Farmer We're happy to announce the second CFP for our MLA panels at MLA 2019! CFP: MELVILLE'S QUARREL WITH MODERNITY In anticipation of an energized year in Melville studies (when on the 200th anniversary of his birth we consider Melville’s significance in the present moment) contributors to this panel will reflect on a vital but largely unexplored feature of Melville’s thinking: his quarrel with modernity. Melville is not recognized for the clarity of his philosophical arguments. At best, his philosophizing is dismissed as ingenious but muddled. But perhaps Melville’s philosophical arguments have been hard to grasp because they have been miscategorized; they have been taken to embody the ethos of the distinctively modern world (that is, after the defining work of Descartes and Locke) when in fact what they offer is nothing less than a wide-ranging rejection of modernity’s dominant assumptions. On this panel, accordingly, we will use Melville’s writing to turn a harsh light on some of the beliefs that characterize modern Western thought. Melville’s writing has meant many things to many people, but as yet it has not been seen as a way to unite or bring into conversation the growing number of theorists resisting the modernity narrative—theorists making an effort to knock down the edifice of dualism, think carefully about where the nature-culture binary has come from (and what we might imagine in its place), cast doubt on the view that the body is inessential to mind, and in other ways question the account of the world offered by the moderns. Please send 300-500 words and a vita to K.L. Evans at mail@klevans.org by March 19.
2018-02-16T18:25:30+0000
Chad Beck Moby-Dick is discussed at 39:00. Also relevant (and leading directly into M-D) is a discussion about Job (31:23).
Russell Brand & Jordan Peterson - Kindness VS Power | Under The Skin #46 youtube.com Recently making the headlines after a combative interview about the gender pay gap with Channel 4’s Cathy Newman, my guest today is Jordan Peterson, who disc...
2018-02-16T01:00:29+0000
Greg Lennes Melvillean Humor for Valentine's Day - Melville's First Draft of Moby-Dick: Comic strip by Mikey Heller (2014) :) 2018-02-14T17:59:34+0000
Greg Lennes Moby-Dick stars on Antiques Roadshow on PBS TV (2/12/18) video - Appraisal of Moby-Dick edition illustrated by Rockwell Kent and published by Lakeside Press 1930.
Appraisal: 1930 Rockwell Kent-Illustrated "Moby Dick" Set | Antiques Roadshow | PBS pbs.org Appraisal: 1930 Rockwell Kent-Illustrated "Moby Dick" Set in New Orleans, LA.
2018-02-13T14:27:18+0000
Greg Lennes The final volume of the Northwestern-Newberry THE WRITINGS OF HERMAN MELVILLE--LAST OF 15 VOLUMES in hardback - a major literary accomplishment. 2018-02-14T14:20:22+0000
Greg Lennes REMINDER: March 1st deadline for registration for the two-week program called “Teaching Melville” that will take place this summer in New Bedford. The Whaling Museum will host the event which will take place from June 17th through the 30th. Go to website for details.
Teaching Melville teachingmelville.org An Institute for School Teachers on Herman Melville’s "Moby-Dick" and the World of Whaling in the Digital Age
2018-02-14T17:31:38+0000
Karen Lentz Madison Melvilleans!
2018-02-14T13:26:46+0000
Robert Sandberg A Call for Book Proposals: From Richard King of the University Press of New England http://www.upne.com/series/SEA.html The University Press of New England and the Williams College-Mystic Seaport Maritime Studies Program seek book proposals for our “Seafaring America” series. We are looking for works in three categories: 1. Suggestions for timely reissues of forgotten, out-of-print American works of literary and cultural distinction, with new introductions that frame the work for a modern audience. 2. Proposals for anthologies and/or selected editions of writers’ work. 3. Proposals for books of original scholarship or of general interest, according to the series mission below. We have particular interest in underrepresented voices and “blue” environmental studies. _______________________ “Seafaring America” is a series of original and classic works of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama exploring the history of America’s engagement with our oceans and coastlines. Spanning diverse eras, populations, and geographical settings, the series strives to introduce, revive, and aggregate a wide range of exemplary and/or seminal stories about our American maritime heritage. This includes the accounts of First Peoples, explorers, voluntary and forced immigrants, women in maritime communities, fishermen, whalers, captains, common sailors, members of the navy and coast guard, marine biologists and oceanographers, and the crews of vessels ranging from lifeboats, riverboats, and tugboats to recreational yachts. “Seafaring America” introduces new stories of maritime interest and reprints books that have fallen out of circulation and deserve reappraisal. The series also publishes selections from well-known works that warrant reconsideration because of the lessons they offer about our relationship with our watery planet.
UPNE | Seafaring America upne.com Series Editor: Richard J. King, Williams College-Mystic SeaportSeafaring America is a series of original and classic works of nonfiction, fiction, poetry, and drama exploring the history of America’s engagement with our oceans and coastlines. Spanning diverse eras, perspectives, and geographical s...
2018-02-14T01:00:15+0000
Greg Lennes To the wealthy Melvillean: Auction for a first edition of Moby-Dick ending March 7th. 2018-02-13T19:36:41+0000

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Fellowships and Scholarships


Melville Society Archive
Walter E. Bezanson Fellowship
 
 
The Melville Society, under the auspices of the Melville Society Cultural Project in New Bedford, offers an annual fellowship to help a scholar undertake research on Herman Melville at the Society’s Archive in the Research Library of the Whaling Museum in New Bedford, Massachusetts.

 

Click here for more information and application details.

 

New York Public Library
Short-term Research Fellowships

 

Graduate students or other affiliated academics whose work would benefit from visiting the Manuscripts and Archives Division to view collections such as the Gansevoort-Lansing collection, and Duyckinck family papers are encouraged to apply.

 

Click here for more information and application details.

From Our Photo Collections

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click to start slideshow

Woodlawn Cemetary

WoodlawnWoodlawn Cemetary - final resting place of Herman, his wife, Elizabeth, and other family members. Click here to view photos of the gravesites.

125th Anniversary Celebration

125th Woodlawn

A celebration of Melville's life at Woodlawn Cemetary on the 125th anniversary of his passing.

Lansingburgh Historical Society

Melville House

Melville lived for nine years in this Lansingburgh house. It was here that he wrote Typee and Omoo

Berkshire Historical Society

ArrowheadMelville's Arrowhead home and farm in Pittsfield, MA where he wrote Moby-Dick and lived for most of the 1850s.