Herman Melville - J.O. Eaton Portrait - 1870 - by Permission of Harvard University
Portrait by Joseph Oriel Eaton, 1870, by permission of Houghton Library, Harvard University [*61Z-4]
(click to view larger image)

Leviathan

whale-trp200Leviathan: A Journal of Melville Studies appears three times a year in March, June, and October. We welcome articles, notes, reviews, and creative writing on the life, works, and influence of novelist and poet Herman Melville (1819-1891). Click here for more information.

Melville Electronic Library

mel-thumb-crpd-3The Melville Electronic Library is an online resource for Melville texts. Housed on a Hofstra University server, MEL is being developed and maintained by a group of Melville scholars and digital specialists.

Johns Hopkins University Press

jhup-logoTo join the Melvillle Society and subscribe to Leviathan, visit Leviathan's Johns Hopkins University Press journal site by clicking here.

Melville Society Cultural Project

Melville Society and New Bedford Whaling Museum Cultural Project The New Bedford Whaling Museum in collaboration with The Melville Society is the established home of the Melville Society Cultural Project and Melville Society Archive. The Melville Society Archive is housed at the New Bedford Whaling Museum's Research Library, where significant works from this collection are also on display. The Melville Society Cultural Project also sponsors a book donation program and presents exciting annual events including the Moby-Dick Marathon and a Birthday Lecture.

New Bedford Whaling Museum


Practicing "Panis Angelicus" in the Pantheon -- Eighth International Melville Conference, Rome, June 2011.

-- Karen Madison

"So destinatë më voglië partirë" — Neapolitan Folk Singers-Dancers with Frame Drum at the Eighth International Melville Conference, Rome, June 2011.

-- Karen Madison

Melvilleans at the Colisseum--the red pinwheel is how we kept track of each other while we traveled across Rome as a group--on the subway. Giorgio's graduate students were in charge and were amazing. Eighth International Melville Conference, Rome, June 2011.

--Karen Madison
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"Michelamma" performed by Gordon Poole and son, Frederico at the Eighth International Melville Conference, June 2011.

-- Karen Madison

"Lu Cardillo" - "The Goldfinch" performed by Gordon Poole and son, Frederico at the Eighth International Melville Conference, June 2011.

-- Karen Madison

"Fenesta vascia" - "Low Window" performed by Gordon Poole and son, Frederico at the Eighth International Melville Conference, June 2011.

-- Karen Madison
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"O guarracino"--"The Damselfish," sung by "Folk Musicians from the Naples Countryside: Songs on the Frame Drum." The couple dancing is Gabriele D'Ajello Caracciolo and his wife Anna Perotta. Performed at the Eighth International Melville Conference.

-- Karen Madison

"Te voglio bene assaje"--"I Love You So" a Neapolitan folk song performed by Gordon Poole and his son, Frederico, in the Trattoria Vanvitelli. Performed at the Eighth International Melville Conference.

-- Karen Madison

Gordon Poole and Gabriele D’Ajello Caracciolo, along with musicians and dancers from the Vesuvian area, performed Neapolitan folk music for the Eighth International Melville Society Conference on June 27, 2011, at Trattoria Vanviteli in Naples. The video was an amateur, impromptu recording using a Flip (mp3) camera from a stationary position.

-- Thomas D. Zlatic

From the Galleries

Jake Heggie - Premiere Ahab Symphony
(click for slideshow)
Jake Heggie - Premiere Ahab Symphony

Woodlawn Cemetary

WoodlawnWoodlawn Cemetary - final resting place of Herman, his wife, Elizabeth, and other family members. Click here to view photos of the gravesites.

 

125th Anniversary Celebration

125th Woodlawn

A celebration of Melville's life at Woodlawn Cemetary on the 125th anniversary of his passing.

Lansingburgh Historical Society

Melville House

Melville lived for nine years in this Lansingburgh house. It was here that he wrote Typee and Omoo

Berkshire Historical Society

ArrowheadMelville's Arrowhead home and farm in Pittsfield, MA where he wrote Moby-Dick and lived for most of the 1850s.